Early 20th Century FB Party Giveaways

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

We’re having another Facebook themed party on October 6th, 6:00 – 10:00 pm with Christian Historical Fiction from the Early 20th Century (1900-1940). Prizes include a $50 Amazon Card and 8 featured novels from 8 different authors.

Click this link to join the party.

Grand Prize: $50 Amazon Card
Runner Up Prize: 8 Christian Novels featuring early 20th century historical themes (may be eBook or paperback)

HOW TO ENTER:
• Click you will attend the party.
• Share the party on your timeline.
• Comment on a post by any 2 authors during the party.
Authors may give additional prizes which will be announced at the end of the party. Individual authors will post requirements for each individual prize.

Featured Authors:
6:00 EST/5:00/4:00/3:00 Tamera Lynn Kraft
6:30 EST/5:30/4:30/3:30 Jennifer Leo
7:00 EST/6:00/5:00/4:00 Elizabeth Camden
7:30 EST/6:30/5:50/4:30 Donna Schlachter
8:00 EST/7:00/6:00/5:00 Dawn Kinzer
8:30 EST/7:30/6:30/5:30 Debra Marvin
9:00 EST/8:00/7:00/6:00 Anne Greene
9:30 EST/8:30/7:30/6:30 Naomi Musch
10:00 EST – Announce Winners

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How a Native American Brought the Great Awakening to the Indians

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Samson Occom, a native American born in a wigwam, became one of the first ordained Indian preachers, the first Native American to be published, and the only one to travel with Evangelist George Whitefield during the Great Awakening in America. He brought Christianity to the Indian tribes in his area of the country, yet most have never heard his story.

Samson was born in 1723 as part of the the Mohegan tribe near New London, Connecticut. His parents were Joshua and Sarah Ockham, direct descendants of Uncas, a famous Mohegan chief. At the age of 16, Occom heard his first sermon during the Great Awakening. His mother Sarah was one of the first Mohegan converts.

Samson was stirred by what he heard and began to study English so he could read the Bible for himself. A year later he became a Christian under the preaching of James Davenport. He started going to a school for Indians and white boys started by evangelist Eleazar Wheelock and spent four years at Wheelock’s school. He was a gifted student, but poor eyesight prevented him from going to college.

He taught school and ministered to the Montauk Indians for eleven years. He used many creative methods including singing and card games as teaching devices. When Azariah Horton, the white Presbyterian minister to the Montauk, retired, Samson took his place as pastor.

Samson married Mary Fowler in 1751, and they had ten children. The church  paid him a much smaller salary than the white men doing the same job. To make ends meet, he bound books and carved spoons, pails, and gun stocks for his white neighbors. Despite the prejudice he faced, in 1759, Samson became on of the first ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church.


His passion was to share the Gospel with other Native Americans, and he was commission by the Scotch Society of Missions to preach to the Cherokee in Georgia and Tennessee. Fighting among the Cherokee and white settles put those plans on hold, so instead he went to New York to preach among the Oneida.

In 1765, Samson traveled with George Whitefield, Great Awakening preacher, during his sixth preaching tour in the colonies. Later that year, he traveled to England with Nathaniel Whitaker to raise money for Wheelock’s Indian Charity School. Over the next two years, he preached over 200 sermons in England and was well received. He raised over 11,000 pounds, the most ever raised for a ministry in the colonies. While in England Samson visited with John Newton, writer of Amazing Grace, and received an honorary degree from the University of Edinburgh which he politely declined.

When he returned to America in 1768, Samson found that Wheelock had failed to care for his wife and children as promised. Samson’s family was living in poverty. The rift widened when he learned Wheelock had used the money he’d raised to move the school to New Hampshire and decided to exclude Indians. Wheelock renamed the school Dartmouth.

Samson was a prolific writer throughout his lifetime. He kept a diary from 1743 to 1790 about his work that became an historic document. In 1772, he preached a temperance sermon at the execution of a Native American who murdered a man while he was drunk. That sermon became a best seller. He also wrote and published hymns. He is recognized as the first Native American to become published.


When Samson became a defender of land claims of the Montauk and Oneida against speculators, false rumors were spread that he was a heavy drinker and not even a Mohegan which caused the loss of support from his denomination and several missionary societies. He wrote an autobiography to defend himself, but it did little good.


Throughout the 1770s and 1780s, Samson preached among the Mohegan and other tribes in New England. After the Revolutionary War, he settled in Brothertown, New York on a reservation for New England Indians where he establish the first Indian Presbyterian Church. In 1791, he died while gathering wood to finish the new church building.


His legacy continued after his death through his children, students, and converts who also ministered to Native Americans. Two of his students also became authors. Besides being the first Native American who was published, Samson fought for Native American rights, spread the Gospel to New England tribes, and promoted education for Native Americans. 

 

Are You Ready for Autumn?

by Carole Brown

I LOVE Autumn. One of my favorite seasons, when the end of September is nearing, I began to get antsy w/anticipation of decorating for it! I thought I’d share a few photos that might give you a little inspiration for the season.

First, here are some ideas of WHAT can be used: 

The obvious and not-so obvious:

  • Gourds and pumpkins
  • Nuts, berries (like wild ones: bittersweet, etc.), leaves, acorns, 
  • Containers: jars (unique and old), cans (big and little), outdoor objects like wheelbarrels, bicycles, chairs, benches, window sills, porch steps, wooden stumps, picnic tables, discarded toys, etc.
  • Other stuff: hay bales, hay stacked into tall shapes, veggies, fruits, herbs, farm equipment, old wheels, trash cans

Now, the pictures:

barrel n gourds free

 

Love this old barrel topped with harvest gourds, pumpkins and vines. 

 

erika free

 

Totally adore these blues, purples and yellows! What an eye-catching decor. Already planning on using this idea!

 

 

drawing on wood free

 

 

If you’re good with art work, you might love this one. I can’t draw a straight line, so it’s out for me…but stencils and other sort of things might help create this or many different designs.

 

 

twig pic frame free

 

 

Love this too! Planning on using it this fall with my own “adaptations” to it! 🙂

 

 

thanksgiving outdoor decor free

 

So cute! I can’t stand the one-eyed thing (just me!) but you could decorate it to suit your fancy

 

 

What is your favorite you use? Want to include a picture? Would love to see it!

Review of Barbara Ann Derksen’s: Redemptive Justice

by Carole Brown Redemptive Justice: Finders Keepers Mystery Series by [Derksen, Barbara Ann]

Blurb:

What happens when truth is perverted to suit the circumstances?

Christine Smith, owner of Finders Keepers Investigative Services, and Jeremy Goodman, owner of Goodman Investigations, discover the answer when they decide to help a woman recover her children from a Mennonite village in Mexico.

Drug running and human trafficking are justified by Church Elders who place money and control above the people they are supposed to lead. Christine’s new faith explores the contradictions in the search for Redemptive Justice.

 

My Thoughts:

Once again, Derksen delivers a believeable and entrancing novel with diligent detectives, Jeremy Goodman and Christine Smith. I especially like intense books with hard current topics written within, and Derksen brings it out beautifully!

And who’s heart doesn’t break at the plight of the little girl, despised and abused, with seemingly no hope? It makes you want to pull her from that despicable place and hugged her so tightly she’ll never feel pain or unloved again.

Then you have the detectives. I love the comradeship between them, their personalities and the way they work together. They bring life to the stories and draw readers into the setting.

But drug running and human trafficing are just two of the evils Jeremy and Christine must face as they work to save the children of one woman. Set in Old Mexico, the two friends and detectives face prejudices and danger as they labor together to save the day yet another time.

You won’t want to miss reading this newest book from Derksen. Written with a particularly sound ability to create realistic dialog and convincing scenes, you’ll find yourself using the midnight oil to finish this novel. Heartily recommended!

 

About Barbara:

Barbara Ann Derksen

 

Seeking to encourage, inspire, and invite, Barbara Ann Derksen writes about Kingdom living characters who live in a not-so Kingdom world. She has been scrambling letters into enjoyable fiction and non-fiction for over 20 years and a published writer since 2003. Her readers share how the books are hard to put down, keep them up at night reading long after lights out, and spur them on to a closer walk with their Lord.

Her favorite genre is mystery so, to thrill her readers, she composes a new one every year.

She has just completed the four book series, The Wilton Strait Mystery Series, now available through her website, on Amazon in Canada, Europe, and the US, and through Amazon’s Kindle store as e-books as well as Smashwords for e-book readers other than Kindle.

  • Vanished,
  • Presumed Dead,
  • Fear Not, and
  • Silence

are a series that provides hours of entertainment, food for thought, and keep her readers wanting more.

The first book in the Finders Keepers Series: 

  • Shadow Stalker, was released May 5, 2013 and is available on Amazon http://amzn.to/13pABhF. with mostly 5 star reviews.
  • In 2014, Book 2, Essence of Evil made its appearance with mostly five star reviews and now…
  • the sequel, Wicked Disregard, released February 2016, is making its debut.
  • A 4th book in this series is in the works with plans to publish in 2017.

Barbara has also penned a devotional series with six books, 4 children’s stories and two other non-fiction books. Dance With a Broom and Second to None

Barbara Ann Derksen has written 19 books, mystery, children’s and devotions. She and her husband, Henry, have been married for 46 years, have four children, and eleven grandchildren. Henry is a singer/songwriter with 8 CDs to his name, working on his 9th.

Connect with her here:

Website:  www.barbaraannderksen.com/

Twitter:  @BarbaraADerksen

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/barbara.a.derksen

LinkedIn:  http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=37561352&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile

 

Buy her books here:

AMAZON:  https://www.amazon.com/Barbara-Ann-Derksen/e/B006V4JD5M

GOODREADS:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5154682.Barbara_Ann_Derksen

Website:  www.barbaraannderksen.com/

Smashwords:  https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/BarbaraAnnDerksen

 

 

Happy Reading!

 

 

 

10 Steps to Declutter Your Home.

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Clutter is an epidemic in the US. Many of us have way to much stuff to enjoy what we have, but we worry about parting with some of it for sentimental reasons or because we spent a lot of money on it. How much money we wasted is in the past. If we want a peaceful environment, room to stay organized, and a place for everything so we don’t have to spend precious time looking for it, we need to get rid of our stuff. Trust me. It will feel so good when your done.

Start at the front door of your house. Many people are paralysis when they consider where to start. I’ll make it easy for you. Start at the front door. Are there any shoes there you don’t wear? Do you have too many coats? If you have more than three winter coats, you have too many.

Go in a clockwise circle around the room and organize. Next circle the room. As you get to each place in your room, decide what you need to keep and what needs to go. Then go to the next room.

Keep four boxes and trashcan with you.

The first box is labeled “Put Away”. This is for stuff that you need to put away or find a place for. Resist the temptation to put it away now. You might have a lot more room when you’re done.

The second box is labeled “Give Away” or “Sell”. These are items that have some value but you don’t need. It’s difficult to part with something you spent money on, but if you give it to the poor or sell it, you’ll feel better about freeing up that space. After you’re done decluttering, sell this stuff on e-bay or at a garage sale and make some money, or take it to the Salvation Army or AmVets. There also might be some items family members would cherish. Consider giving some of your stuff to them.

The third box is for storage. These are items you need, but you don’t need them all the time. Christmas and Fall decorations would fall in this category. Label each storage box with what is in that box for easy reference later.

The fourth box is for keepsakes and memorials that mean a great deal to you. This box is not for the pencil your nine year old took to school his first day of Kindergarten. These keepsakes should be important and irreplaceable. Things like your wedding certificate and your children’s first teeth might go here. After you’re finished organizing, you can go back to this box and decide how to display some of these items. If you don’t have room to display them, it might be better to get rid of them. Keeping a keepsake packed away in the garage for years doesn’t help you feel any fond memories about it.

The trashcan is for everything else. Be merciless about this. You don’t need 20 pieces of string just in case. You don’t need a cleaning product you never used but bought because it looked good on QVC. You don’t need a 20 gallon drum of Spic and Span. Get rid of it and free up your space and your life. You might also want to have a recycle bag for items you can take to the recycle plant later. See, you are helping the environment by decluttering.

Evaluate your stuff. Have you used it in the last year? Do you intend to use it within a month? Does it have great sentimental value? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, you can keep it. Otherwise get rid of it. You will be amazed at how much stress you can get rid of by getting rid of your stuff.

Repeat in every room.

Go through the keepsakes again. After you’re finished organizing, you can go back to this box and decide how to display some of these items. Keeping a keepsake packed away in the garage for years doesn’t help you feel any fond memories about it. One idea is to start a scrapbook or memory box for each of your children. If you have too many keepsakes to fill one memory box for each child or to display your treasures, go through them again, and try to cut them down by half.

Organize Puzzle Shows Arranging Or OrganizingFind a place for all your put away items. At this point, you may have to get rid of some of them. You don’t need 53 pens and 7 pairs of scissors. The first time I went through this process, I found out I had seven 99 cent turkey basters. My husband convinced me to keep two so I had a back-up, but nobody needs seven turkey basters. Get rid of excess items.

Find a place for your storage boxes. They should be easily accessible but not take up prime space in your home. A storage closet, shelves in the garage, the attic, or the basement work well for storage boxes.

Find a place for your garage sale or e-bay items and label the boxes with the date. If you don’t sell them within a year, take them to the Salvation Army. You never will get to selling them if your haven’t within a year. Do not open the boxes to look through them at this point. You’ve gone without them for this long. It’s time to let go.

Repeat decluttering process at least once a year. Enjoy the peace that comes from a decluttered house.

3 Steps to Writing a Query Letter

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Queries are the letters you write to publishers and agents to ask or query them if you can submit your proposal, sample pages or manuscript. This is different than a cover letter. In a cover letter, you’re letting the agent or publisher know what you’re submitting. A query letter asks permission to submit materials. A good query letter will give the agent or publisher enough information to help him decide if he’s interested.

Most queries are sent by email. Some publishers and agents forego the query process and go straight to proposals; most don’t. These are a few things to remember about queries.

Make them short and to the point. Queries should never be more than one page.

Include important information. The query letter should include your contact information, the genre, word count, and any publishing credits you have.

Have a blurb that promotes your book with a hook. This is the time to peak the agent’s or publisher’s interest.

There are many resources out there that tell how to write a good query letter. The most important thing is to spend time writing it. You polished and edited your novel. Do the same with your query. Here’s a few links on other sites about how to write a query letter:

Write At Home – Query Letter Advise & Samples

Writing a Query Letter

Agent Query – How To Write A Query Letter

1920 Changed Fashion Forever

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Studying fashion in 1919-1920 for my
novella, Resurrection of Hope, was difficult because fashion changed so much in the couple of years leading up to the roaring twenties. Only ten years earlier, women had to contend with bustles and corsets. Hobble skirts were gathered
close around the ankles made walking difficult. By the 1915, shirts became full and were just above the ankles. The bustles and corsets that had cursed women for decades were being thrown out. In 1918, straight line dresses were becoming
popular, and skirts were actually a few inches above the ankle. The flapper style we know from the roaring 20s was starting to make its appearance.

In 1918, the flapper era started showing up in the cities first. Most women were conservative and wore their skirts a few inches below their knees which was scandalous five years earlier. By 1922, skirts were worn to the knee even in rural areas. The shift or chemise dress with the lowered waistline became popular in 1916 and continued throughout the 1920s. Tailored suits became popular among working women. Most dresses were sleeveless, and women wore sweaters over them on cold days. Jewelry to accessorize the new look became important, and women wore long beaded and pearl necklaces looped around the neck and large bracelets. In the winter,
women finished the look with long fur coats.

During World War I, many women had to work outside the home. They started to wear bobbed hair styles because they were easier to take care of. By 1920, the style took off and most women bobbed their hair even in more rural areas and conservative areas of the country. Cloche hats that fit tight around the face were becoming popular and went with the new short hair styles.

 

In the Victorian era, make-up was considered vulgar, but that changed in the early 1900s. By 1900, women started wearing powder to achieve a pale look. Once that became acceptable, women started wearing makeup to look younger without looking like they were actually wearing makeup. Max Factor opened in 1909 with its first makeup counter and supplied makeup to silent movie actresses. In 1917, Theda Bara started a trend by wearing heavy eye makeup in the movie Cleopatra. Women in the city started wearing make-up to look like the actresses on the silent movie screen. It was a few more years before the average farmwife would be seen in public wearing makeup.

 

The biggest change was ladies’ undergarments. Although the corsets didn’t disappear completely, one piece camisoles and slips became the desired undergarments. Because of shorter hemlines, silk hosiery was invented in 1920. It became the fashion for years after that. Bras didn’t come out until 1922, so most women either wore modified corsets or only wore camisoles. Never again would the restrictive clothing of the 1800s limit women.

 

Resurrection of Hope

She thought he was her knight in shining armor, but will a marriage of convenience prove her wrong?

After Vivian’s fiancé dies in the Great War, she thinks her life is over. But Henry, her fiancé’s best friend, comes to the rescue offering a marriage of convenience. He claims he promised his friend he would take care of her. She grows to love him, but she knows it will never work because he never shows any love for her.

Henry adores Vivian and has pledged to take care of her, but he won’t risk their friendship by letting her know. She’s still in love with the man who died in the Great War. He won’t risk heartache by revealing his true emotions.