10 Things Fathers Should Tell Their Sons

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

My grandsons have declared war with my husband, Rick

My grandsons have declared war with my husband, Rick

My husband was a is a good father. Because of his example, my son is a good father who is raising his two sons to be godly men. Every boy or man should hear these 10 things from his father by the time he becomes an adult.

My son Jonathan with his 2 sons

My son Jonathan with his 2 sons

1. Treat your mother with respect. She’s my wife.

2. I’m proud of the man you’ve become.

3. Nothing worthwhile comes easy.

4. Be a man. Do the hard thing because it’s right.

5. Be a man of your word.

6. Treat every woman as if she’s a lady.

7. Be a gentleman. It will never be politically incorrect no matter what they say.

My son playing with his sons at Myrtle Beach

My son playing with his sons at Myrtle Beach

8. I love you enough to find out where you’re going, who you’ll be with, and when you’ll get home.

9. Choose a woman based on her mind, personality, and values, not her looks.

10. I’ll always love you no matter what you do.

 

 

10 Things Fathers Should Tell Their Daughters

Daughter Veronica with my husband Rick and me at her college graduation

Daughter Veronica with Rick and me at her college graduation

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

My husband, Rick, has a special relationship with our daughter, Veronica. When she was young, he would take her on dates to show her how a man should treat her. Every girl and woman needs to hear these 10 things coming from the lips of her father by the time she becomes an adult.

1. You are beautiful.

2. You deserve a man who will treat you like a princess.

Veronica and her dad dancing at her wedding

3. If any man hurts you, they’ll have to deal with me.

4. I love you enough to find out where you’re going, who you’ll be with, and when you’ll get home.

5. May I have this Dance?

6. You can be anything you want to be.

7. I’m proud of you.

8. I’m amazed at how smart and talented you are.

9. Would you like to go on a date with me?

10. I’ll always love you no matter what you do.

Nathan Hale: America’s First Martyred Spy

by Tamera Lynn Kraft
Long before the days of the CIA and Cold War, even before the spies of the Civil War, our nation had a network of spies that rivaled any spy agency of today. The leader of this spy ring, the Culpeper Ring in New York City, was Benjamin Tallmadge, an officer in the Continental Army. One reason Tallmadge may have been so driven to create this spy ring is because his best friend from college, Nathan Hale, was hung as a spy on his first intelligence gathering mission in New York.

Nathan Hale was born in Connecticut in 1755. Before his fourteenth birthday, he and his brother, Enoch, were sent to Yale University to get an education. Nathan’s father was a minister and planned for Nathan to follow in his footsteps.

At Yale, Nathan became close friends with Benjamin Tallmadge and William Hull, a man who worked with Tallmadge. Hale’s university days created in him a desire to be free from the rule of the British Crown as it did with most of his contemporaries. When he graduated, instead of becoming a minister, he took a job teaching at a private school in East Haddam.

When war broke out, Hale was reluctant to join the army, but at the urging of Tallmadge in a letter, joined up in 1775. For the next year, he saw no action. It disturbed him because he felt he was doing nothing to further the independence of the American Colonies.

In September, Washington was desperate for intelligence about the British troop movements in Manhattan. That information would determine his next move. He asked for volunteers. At that time, most didn’t consider spying a respectable occupation, and nobody was willing to volunteer for such a dangerous mission. Nathan Hale, who was eager to do something to help his country, stepped up and said he would do it.

Hale snuck into Manhattan and got the information he needed. Before heading back, he stopped at a tavern where he was recognized by Robert Rogers, commander of Rogers’ Rangers. Earlier, Rogers had attempted to get free passage behind enemy lines, telling Washington he was a patriot. His real intentions were to spy for the British. Washington denied his request, but during that time, he had seen Hale in uniform.

Rogers needed proof Hale was a spy and invited him to his home where he informed Hale that he was a patriot. Hale fell into the trap, and was arrested. After admitting he was a spy, he was sentenced to hang by General William Howe.

When Hale was at the gallows, the last sight he probably saw was New York City burning. A fire had started accidently, but knowing it would help the Americans, many patriot civilians started more fires or did things to slow the British in putting out the fires. Many of these patriots were captured and executed. The fire did stop the British from taking up residence in the city.

Hale’s last words were immortalized as the sentiment of American Patriots. “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” This quote is reported by Tallmadge and Hull, Hale’s friends who were not present at the execution. The quote is probably a condensed quote of what he really said. Hull and Tallmadge were at the site shortly after the execution to facilitate a prisoner exchange and talked to a British officer, John Montresor about what Hale’s last words were. Others reported other things Hale may have said, so his speech was longer than the reported quote.

Frederick MacKensie, a British officer, wrote this diary entry for the day, “He behaved with great composure and resolution, saying he thought it the duty of every good Officer, to obey any orders given him by his Commander-in-Chief; and desired the Spectators to be at all times prepared to meet death in whatever shape it might appear.”

Whatever the case, at his death, Hale was a patriot and the first American spy executed for his exploits of bravery.

My Ten Favorite Things About Late Spring

by Carole Brown

Although I still love Autumn, Spring has made hardy leaps and bounds pushing to be my favorite season. This year has been particularly pleasant. Here are a fegrass n dew freew of my thoughts about the season:

  1. Warmer weather. What can I say? Although I use to love winter activities, I’ve moved on and prefer warmer weather ones. The cold is definitely at the bottom of my list!
  2. The joy I feel. Yes, that’s right. The winter is past, and a new beginning is taking place. I enjoy that feeling of renewal starting right around Easter and progressing till the middle of June. Time to let go of the hardship of winter (trials, discouragements, etc.) and move on. Take a brighter look around.
  3. The letree freeafing of trees. Believe it or not, I kept an eye on the trees and watched as they regained life. Leafy trees are a reminder of childhood times spent climbing them and playing imaginary games. Leafy trees remind me of the summers reclining beneath them as a teenager and dreaming teen dreams. 
  4. Release from the indoors. Of course, I go outdoors during winter, but now–during spring–doors and windows are open. The outdoors and indoors meet in a joined effort to give me a enduring satisfaction that life is good.
  5. Gardening! Not that I love the work so much, but I love to see the completed jobs, love the few veggies we grow, love seeing hubby and grandson Jonathan picking the produce, and love the sense of doing a good work. 
  6. little-boy-in-dandelions freeIt’s the time of Picking-the-wildflowers. Is there anything sweeter than seeing a grandson running up to you with a bouquet of dandelions (stems almost too short to stick in a vase or other container)? Or to accept a bouquet of pink apple blossoms or black-eyed Susans from hubby? I think not!
  7. The scents and sights. Is there any better sensation than the sweet, pleasant scent of a rose? The strong, heady scent of lilacs, hyacinths, or lilies? Is there anything lovelier than seeing the lilies of the Valley blooming beneath a pink dogwood tree or the shy purple violets peeking from beneath bolder foliage? What could be cuter than those precious pansy faces?
  8. Repurposing, planning, and projects. It’s the time to change things around. Take that old wood table you don’t want anymore and redo it to make a perfect garden work table to repot flowers, etc. Plan a new garden. Begin new projects you’ve dreamed of all winter. Now’s the time! grill free
  9. The-Firing-of-the-Grill time! Isn’t the first time you do this fantastically fun? All winter the grill has stayed covered or spent its days in a secluded area. Now it’s time for it to shine, to do what it was created for! Look out corn on the cob! Drooling for those chicken breasts, steaks and, the all time favorites: burgers and hotdogs! Yay!
  10. desert island sunset freeFinally, it’s time for vacations. Plan, if you haven’t already. Begin the buying for the necessities, prep the vehicle or buy your tickets. Summer prospects are ahead, and the spring anticipation is as much a part of the fun as experiencing it!

 

There you have it. Ten of my favorite items. I could add holiday celebrations (Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day) with family and friends, old-fashion ministry experiences like camp meetings or church camps or mission trips, camping, shared sporting activities: boating, fishing, water skiing, etc., but these are all a given. 

Whatever your favorites are for this season, stay relaxed, keep the peace within yourself, and enjoy. Thank God for Spring for God gives us all of the seasons to enjoy, and I really don’t think he minds which one is our favorite.

What’s your favorite thing about Spring?

Happy Days!

Top 10 Classic TV Shows about Fathers

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Father’s Day will be here soon. Many great classic TV shows have featured fathers. Here are 10 of my favorites.

10. Rifleman

1958-1963

This fun half hour western centers on widower, Lucas, who has a reputation with a rifle. Luke and his son, Mark, are trying to build a new life on their ranch.

Starring: Chuck Conners, Johnny Crawford, Paul Fix

9. Seventh Heaven

1996-2007

A minister and his wife raise seven children while trying to keep their sense of humor.

Starring: Stephen Collins, Catherine Hicks, Barry Watson, David Gallagher, Jessica Biel, Beverley Mitchell, Mackenzie Rosman, Nikolas Brino, Lorenzo Brino

8. Courtship of Eddie’s Father

1969-1972

This is a remake of a tear-jerker movie with Glenn Ford. Eddie works hard to try to find a wife for his widowed father.

Starring: Bill Bixby, Brandon Cruz

7. Home Improvement

1991-1999

Even though I’m not big on bungling fathers, this is one of the funniest shows I’ve ever watched.

Starring: Tim Allen, Patricia Richardson, Earl Hindman, Zachery Ty Bryan, Richard Karn, Jonathan Taylor Thomas

6. Bonanza

1959-1973

In one of the best westerns ever made, Ben and his three sons build a ranch in the Old West.

Starring: Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts

5. Family Affair

1966-1971

This is a tear-jerker that is rarely even seen on reruns. A teenager, and a twin boy and girl lose their mother and father. In their grief, they are separated and passed from relative to relative until they are all dropped off at Uncle Bill’s New York high rise condominium. Bill is a playboy and a bachelor with a butler and a string of girlfriends, but these orphans touch his heart and change his life.

Starring: Brian Keith, Sebastian Cabot, Kathy Garver, Johnny Whittaker, Anissa Jones

4. Andy Griffith Show

1960-1968

This show is about a community more than a family, but the relationship between widower Andy and son Opie is an important dynamic to it.

Starring: Andy Griffith, Ronnie Howard, Don Knotts

3. The Bill Cosby Show

1984-1992

I love how this show made us all relate and laugh at ourselves. I don’t approve of Bill Cosby’s actions, but I don’t approve of most TV actors and their lifestyles. That being said, a list like this wouldn’t be complete without this show.

Starring: Bill Cosby, Fred Pinkard, Joyce Buifant, Lee Weaver, Olga James, Sid McCoy

2. My Three Sons

1960-1972

This is a show about a widowed father raising his three sons. It’s funny, heartwarming, and will sometimes bring a tear to your eyes. I especially like the later episodes with Willian Demarest, Barry Livingstone, and Tina Cole.

Starring: Fred MacMurray, William Demarest, Don Grady, Stanley Livingston, Barry Livingston, Tim Considine, William Frawley, Meredith MacRae, Tina Cole, Beverly Garland, Dawn Lyn, Ronne Troup, Daniel, Joseph, and Michael Todd

1. Leave It to Beaver

This show is my all time favorite when it comes to shows about fathers. On the surface, it looks like a typical 1950s family show, but it has so many nuances like the fact that Ward sometimes struggles to be a good father, and June doesn’t always agree with Ward about raising children.

1957-1963

Starring: Barbara Billingsley, Hugh Beaumont, Tony Dow, Jerry Mathers

So do you have a favorite TV show featuring fathers?

My Top Ten Verses about Trust

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

In my novel, Alice’s Notions, Alice is having a hard time figuring out who she can trust. At one point, she asks God to show her. She recognizes something we sometimes forget. We can always put our trust in God.

Trust: Confidence; a reliance or resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship or other sound principle of another person.

Here are my top ten trust Bible verses.

Proverbs 3:5-6 Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.

Psalm 18:2 The LORD is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower.

Psalm 91:1-2 Whoever dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, “He is my refuge and my fortress,
my God, in whom I trust.

Isaiah 26:3-4 You keep him in perfect peace 
whose mind is stayed on you,
because he trusts in you.
Trust in the Lord forever,
for the Lord God is an everlasting rock.

Jeremiah 17:7-8 Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.

Psalm 37:3-6 Commit your way to the Lord; 
trust in him, and he will act. 
He will bring forth your righteousness as the light, 
and your justice as the noonday.

John 14:1 Let not your heart be troubled. You are trusting God, now trust in me. (TLB)

Psalm 56:3-4 When I am afraid, I put my trust in you. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I shall not be afraid. What can flesh do to me?

2 Kings 18:5 He trusted in the Lord, the God of Israel, so that there was none like him among all the kings of Judah after him, nor among those who were before him.

Alice’s Notions

In this quaint mountain town, things aren’t always what they seem.

World War II widow Alice Brighton returns to the safety of her home town to open a fabric shop. She decides to start a barn quilt tour to bring business to the shop and the town, but what she doesn’t know is sinister forces are using the tour for their own nefarious reasons

Between her mysterious landlord, her German immigrant employee, her neighbors who are acting strange, and a dreamboat security expert who is trying to romance her, Alice doesn’t know who she can trust.

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. – D-Day Hero

Every man who fought on the beeches of Normandy during D-Day is a hero. On June 6th, 1944, the largest military seaborne invasion in history took place on the Western Front in France. By late August, all of France had been liberated, and within less than a year, the Nazis faced total defeat. Here is the story of one of those heroes.

Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. (Ted) was the eldest son of President Theodore Roosevelt. When he was born in 1887, his larger-than-life father was just beginning his political career. The younger Roosevelt graduated from Harvard in 1909 and became a successful business man.

When America went to war during World War I, Ted, a reservist, was called to duty and became volunteered to become one of the first soldiers to go to France. There he was known as one of the best battalion commanders in his division. He was so concerned for his men, he once paid for them to all have combat boots with his own money. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his bravery.

After the war, he went back into business and became one of the founders of the American Legion. He remained in the military reserves and took advanced officer’s training. He also served in politics and was the assistant secretary of the Navy for a while.

In 1941, shortly before World War II, Ted returned to active duty in the Army and was promoted to a one star general. When he was assigned to the D-Day task force in 1944, he wrote letters to Major General Barton asking to be allowed to take part in the invasion. His requests were denied numerous times because Barton believed he wouldn’t survive. Finally Barton relented and allowed Ted to lead the battle on Utah Beach.

During the invasion, Ted was one of the first to land on the beach and led his men with courage and calmness. He stood on the beach leaning on a cane reciting antidotes about his father to his troops to steady their nerves. After discovering they had drifted a mile from the invasion site, he said, “We’ll start the war from right here.” Sometimes he worked under fire as a self-appointed traffic cop, untangling traffic jams of trucks and tanks all struggling to get inland and off the beach. One GI later reported that seeing the general walking around, apparently unaffected by the enemy fire, even when clods of earth fell down on him, gave him the courage to get on with the job, saying “if the general is like that it can’t be that bad.”

Roosevelt Jr. died of a heart attack on July 12, 1944, shortly after the D-Day invasion. He was buried near Normandy, and his brother Quentin, who was shot down and killed during World War I, was re interred there. During his time in the military, Roosevelt Jr. was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, Army Distinguished Service Medal, four Silver Star awards and the Legion of Merit. Years later, when General Omar Bradley was asked to name the single most heroic action he had ever seen in combat, he said, “Ted Roosevelt on Utah Beach.”

Today we honor Theodore Roosevelt Jr. and every other brave soldier who died during the D-Day invasion.