7 Reasons Why My Husband is a Good Dad

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Father’s Day will be here in a little over a week, so I thought I’d share why I think my husband is a great dad to our children and how young fathers can emulate his example.

My husband was a great dad to our children. We have grown son and daughter, both married, who don’t live with us. Although they’ve struggled at times, my children have grown up to become responsible adults who love the Lord.

Jonathan and Jenna

 

My son is married and has two sons of his own. He is also a terrific husband and father. He supports his family working as a real estate agent and ministers at his church.

Veronica and DariusMy daughter is married. She will be finishing her Master’s Degree in clinical mental health counseling in December. She currently is an intern at Emerge Christian Counseling Center. She and her godly husband are very involved in their church.

 

Much of the reason my children are who they are is because of their dad. Here’s some of the things he’s done while they were growing up.

He spent time with them. My son and his dad would go to airplane shows, for walks in the park, and to look at race cars together. These were interests my son had, and my husband would take the time to encourage those interests. My daughter and her father would go on dates together. He would do what she wanted to do. That usually meant going out to eat, then going to a romantic movie or shopping. My husband doesn’t like chick flics or shopping, but he loved doing these things with his daughter.

He taught them things. My son knows basic carpentry, home maintenance, and how to do minor car repairs because his father taught him whenever he was doing something around the house. It would have been easier for my husband to fix a car or patch a wall without explaining every step to my son and allowing him to do some of it, but he understood that a good father teaches his children. He also taught my daughter many things like how to change a tire and how a man should treat her on a date.

He prayed with them. Whenever my children had any concerns growing up, my husband would have the same response. “Let’s pray about this.” My children learned that whenever they have a problem, the first response is prayer. To this day, when they have a problem, they will call their dad and hear him say, “Let’s pray.”

AsherHe was a godly example. My husband didn’t get saved until we had been married sixteen years. But even before that, he was a man of integrity. He was always where he said he would be, and I never had to worry about him being unfaithful. After he was saved, he stepped it up a notch by being a godly example in everything he did. He didn’t act one way at church and another way at home. Our children saw what it means to be a Christian by watching my husband.

weddingHe’s a wonderful husband. My husband loves me and shows me respect. He listens to me and supports me. And he’s faithful to me. This is one of the best things a dad can do for his children. He showed my son how to be a good husband, and he showed my daughter what a good husband looks like.

He was a strict disciplinarian. My husband showed his children love, but he also expected certain types of behavior from them. When they failed to meet the mark, there would be consequences. This also showed his love for them because it taught them that morality is the best way and that there are consequences in life.

He taught them life isn’t fair. When my children were growing up, sometimes they would complain that some decision my husband made wasn’t fair or something that happened with their teachers or friends wasn’t fair. Sometimes they were wrong. Sometimes it was fair. But sometimes they were right. Sometimes things happened that weren’t fair.

My husband’s favorite saying during those times was “Life’s not fair.” And it’s true. Life is not fair. Dads help their children most when they teach them this principle. Children need to learn to deal with the unfairness of life without becoming bitter or pessimistic. My husband taught my children that life’s not fair, but that doesn’t give them the excuse to be unfair or unkind or to rebel against authority.

I’d enjoy hearing comments about why your husband or father is a good dad.

 

10 Things Fathers Should Tell Their Sons

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

My grandsons have declared war with my husband, Rick

My grandsons have declared war with my husband, Rick

My husband was a is a good father. Because of his example, my son is a good father who is raising his two sons to be godly men. Every boy or man should hear these 10 things from his father by the time he becomes an adult.

My son Jonathan with his 2 sons

My son Jonathan with his 2 sons

1. Treat your mother with respect. She’s my wife.

2. I’m proud of the man you’ve become.

3. Nothing worthwhile comes easy.

4. Be a man. Do the hard thing because it’s right.

5. Be a man of your word.

6. Treat every woman as if she’s a lady.

7. Be a gentleman. It will never be politically incorrect no matter what they say.

My son playing with his sons at Myrtle Beach

My son playing with his sons at Myrtle Beach

8. I love you enough to find out where you’re going, who you’ll be with, and when you’ll get home.

9. Choose a woman based on her mind, personality, and values, not her looks.

10. I’ll always love you no matter what you do.

 

 

10 Things Fathers Should Tell Their Daughters

Daughter Veronica with my husband Rick and me at her college graduation

Daughter Veronica with Rick and me at her college graduation

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

My husband, Rick, has a special relationship with our daughter, Veronica. When she was young, he would take her on dates to show her how a man should treat her. Every girl and woman needs to hear these 10 things coming from the lips of her father by the time she becomes an adult.

1. You are beautiful.

2. You deserve a man who will treat you like a princess.

Veronica and her dad dancing at her wedding

3. If any man hurts you, they’ll have to deal with me.

4. I love you enough to find out where you’re going, who you’ll be with, and when you’ll get home.

5. May I have this Dance?

6. You can be anything you want to be.

7. I’m proud of you.

8. I’m amazed at how smart and talented you are.

9. Would you like to go on a date with me?

10. I’ll always love you no matter what you do.

Top 10 Classic TV Shows about Fathers

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Father’s Day will be here soon. Many great classic TV shows have featured fathers. Here are 10 of my favorites.

10. Rifleman

1958-1963

This fun half hour western centers on widower, Lucas, who has a reputation with a rifle. Luke and his son, Mark, are trying to build a new life on their ranch.

Starring: Chuck Conners, Johnny Crawford, Paul Fix

9. Seventh Heaven

1996-2007

A minister and his wife raise seven children while trying to keep their sense of humor.

Starring: Stephen Collins, Catherine Hicks, Barry Watson, David Gallagher, Jessica Biel, Beverley Mitchell, Mackenzie Rosman, Nikolas Brino, Lorenzo Brino

8. Courtship of Eddie’s Father

1969-1972

This is a remake of a tear-jerker movie with Glenn Ford. Eddie works hard to try to find a wife for his widowed father.

Starring: Bill Bixby, Brandon Cruz

7. Home Improvement

1991-1999

Even though I’m not big on bungling fathers, this is one of the funniest shows I’ve ever watched.

Starring: Tim Allen, Patricia Richardson, Earl Hindman, Zachery Ty Bryan, Richard Karn, Jonathan Taylor Thomas

6. Bonanza

1959-1973

In one of the best westerns ever made, Ben and his three sons build a ranch in the Old West.

Starring: Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts

5. Family Affair

1966-1971

This is a tear-jerker that is rarely even seen on reruns. A teenager, and a twin boy and girl lose their mother and father. In their grief, they are separated and passed from relative to relative until they are all dropped off at Uncle Bill’s New York high rise condominium. Bill is a playboy and a bachelor with a butler and a string of girlfriends, but these orphans touch his heart and change his life.

Starring: Brian Keith, Sebastian Cabot, Kathy Garver, Johnny Whittaker, Anissa Jones

4. Andy Griffith Show

1960-1968

This show is about a community more than a family, but the relationship between widower Andy and son Opie is an important dynamic to it.

Starring: Andy Griffith, Ronnie Howard, Don Knotts

3. The Bill Cosby Show

1984-1992

I love how this show made us all relate and laugh at ourselves. I don’t approve of Bill Cosby’s actions, but I don’t approve of most TV actors and their lifestyles. That being said, a list like this wouldn’t be complete without this show.

Starring: Bill Cosby, Fred Pinkard, Joyce Buifant, Lee Weaver, Olga James, Sid McCoy

2. My Three Sons

1960-1972

This is a show about a widowed father raising his three sons. It’s funny, heartwarming, and will sometimes bring a tear to your eyes. I especially like the later episodes with Willian Demarest, Barry Livingstone, and Tina Cole.

Starring: Fred MacMurray, William Demarest, Don Grady, Stanley Livingston, Barry Livingston, Tim Considine, William Frawley, Meredith MacRae, Tina Cole, Beverly Garland, Dawn Lyn, Ronne Troup, Daniel, Joseph, and Michael Todd

1. Leave It to Beaver

This show is my all time favorite when it comes to shows about fathers. On the surface, it looks like a typical 1950s family show, but it has so many nuances like the fact that Ward sometimes struggles to be a good father, and June doesn’t always agree with Ward about raising children.

1957-1963

Starring: Barbara Billingsley, Hugh Beaumont, Tony Dow, Jerry Mathers

So do you have a favorite TV show featuring fathers?

Why Memorial Day Used to be Controversial

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

Origins

After the Civil War ended in April, 1865, the loved one in both the North and the South wanted a way to honor their loved ones who had died in the conflict. In the spring of 1866, the families of the dead in Waterloo, New York organized the first Decoration Day. After that, local springtime tributes to the fallen of the Civil War sprang up in various places.

In Columbus, Mississippi on April 25, 1866, a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. But they noticed the graves of the Union soldiers were neglected. This bothered them, so they placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

In 1968, A Civil War Union veteran organization called the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) formed a committee to discuss officially having a day of remembrance. Major General John A. Logan, commander of the GAR, declared Decoration Day should be observed on May 30th and established Decoration Day to be a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. May 30th was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

He ordered for his posts to decorate graves “with the choicest flowers of springtime… We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery which had been established two years earlier. 5,000 people showed up for the ceremonies that centered around the Arlington mansion which was once the home of General Robert E. Lee. General and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant presided over the ceremonies, and many well known politicians attended and made speeches. After all the speeches were over, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR paraded through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers, and singing hymns.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30th throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for observing Memorial Day.

Controversy in the South

Many Southern states weren’t happy about the Union deciding a day to honor the dead. They felt the holiday was exclusively for the Union dead and boycotted it. They formed their own days for honoring the Confederate dead.

Many of these states still have their own Decoration Day. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April. Alabama honors their Confederate dead on the fourth Monday of April. Georgia celebrates on April 26th. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10th, Louisiana on June 3rd, and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19th, and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Although they have their own Confederate Memorial Day, most Southern States now honor the fallen dead in other US wars on the national Memorial Day.

How It Become and What it is Today

While Decoration Day was originally organized to honor those who died in the Civil War, After World War I, it expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, the name was changed to Memorial Day, and the last Monday in May was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress It was then also placed on the last Monday in May.

Every year, on Memorial Day, small American flags are placed on each grave at Arlington Memorial Cemetery, as they are on soldier’s graves throughout our nation. But many families don’t just honor the lives of dead soldiers. They also decorate the graves of all deceased loved ones.

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

Memorial Day – Honoring Those Who Died

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

This Memorial Day, we honor those soldiers who died defending freedom during war time.

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, was officially observed on May 30, 1868 to decorate the graves of soldiers who died during the Civil War. After World War One, it changed to become a day to honor American soldiers who died during wartime throughout American history. Later the name was changed to Memorial Day.

The following list the wars and the number of soldiers who died in battle only. There were many more who died from disease and other factors. All figures are approximate.

American Revolution (1775-1783): 4,435 deaths

War of 1812 (1812-1815): 2,260 deaths

Indian Wars (1817-1898): 1,000 deaths

Mexican War (1846-1848): 1,733 deaths

Civil War (1861-1865): Union deaths 140,414; Confederate deaths 74,524

Spanish American War (1898): 385 deaths

World War 1 (1914-1918): 53,402 deaths

World War 2 (1939-1945): 291,557 deaths

Korean War (1950-1953) 33,741 deaths

Vietnam War (1954-1975) 47,424 deaths

Persian Gulf War (1990-1991) 147 deaths

Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan (2001-present) 1,030 deaths

Iraq War (2003-present) 4,491 deaths

We honor those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. Please comment by listing names of those you know who have died in service to their country and the war the fought in.

A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.  ~Joseph Campbell

What Easter Means to Me

by Carole Brown

I’m sitting at my desk this early morning, typing and occasionally looking out the window. I see the beginnings of spring, with the earlymisty, sunrise morn free flowers, trees pregnant with a promised renewal of life, the sun rays strongly dissipating the heavy mists in the valleys. Reminders that Easter–Resurrection Day–is approaching. And I realize anew what an awesome celebration it truly is. 

  • First and foremost, our God is a true God that loves, faithful to do as He says, just, all knowing, and all powerful. How confident that encourages me to be!

  • Secondly, that such a God cared enough he sent his ONLY beloved son into the world for his creation: mankind. What a sacrifice! What a love! Unlike other so-called gods who demand and never give, our supreme God gave his best and only for us. How humble I feel to know he would, and did, do such a thing!

  • Thirdly, our God’s son is a LIVE Son. He’s not dead. Although, mankind killed him in a horribly, brutal crucifixion, he died to conquer death and the grave, that we might live through Him.  How wonderfully alive I feel because of that life-changing event. Forever more–through this life, even into death, I can have the assurance that I live now, and will live eventually with my God, my Savior and King! 

Thank you, God, for what you did for us, for your love and eternal life you’ve given! 

Happy Easter, my friends!