A Ride in a WWII B-17 Flying Fortress Bomber: Research for No Neutral Ground

I’m welcoming Terri Wangard, WWII novelist! So happy you’re here today, Terri. Readers don’t forget to leave a comment and your email address for a chance to win No Neutral Ground.

Blurb:NNG small
After his father divorces his mother because of her Jewish ancestry, Rafe and the rest of his family flee Germany. As a B-17 navigator, he returns to Europe. Flying missions against his former homeland arouses emotions that surprise Rafe. Despite being rejected, he is troubled by the destruction of Germany and his heart still cries for his father’s love.
Sweden may be neutral, but it’s full of intrigue. Jennie assists the OSS at the American legation in Sweden. She thought she’d be doing passive, behind-the-scenes work. Instead, she’s pushed into an active role to gain intelligence and frustrate the Germans.
How can Rafe and Jennie succeed in their dangerous roles when they are so conflicted?

Buy her book here:  Amazon


Tell us a little bit of how you were called, or began writing. Happenstance? A clear call? A chosen career?
I enjoyed writing in grade school, but didn’t keep it up. I love books and got a Masters of Library Science degree. I read Christian romances from the church library and found many to be so similar, as if they were written by formula. I decided to try writing my own story. That was in the early 2000s. A publisher had the manuscript for a year before saying no thanks. I put writing aside until 2008, when I read Debbie Macomber’s Twenty Wishes. That prompted me to start writing again.

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A Writer’s World of Impossibilities

When I face the desolate impossibility of writing 500 pages, or completing a multitude of tasks or facing an unknown, difficult situation . . .
a sick sense of failure falls on me.

Me: (What a daunting task! 
Can I ever get it done?
I fear not . . .) 
I know I can never do it.
This happens every time.
Me: (Every single time.
Never fails but the haunting fear of failing hovers
like a bird of prey . . .
assuring me I’ll never get it done!)
Then, gradually, I write one page . . . do one task at a time . . . or reach out for encouragement . . .
Take another step. And another.
One day’s work is all I can permit myself to contemplate,
and I eliminate the possibility of never finishing.
Me: (Smile)
–John Steinbeck