Writing the Book Blurb

by Carole Brown

book, old writing free

 

A book blurb is one of the most important items of a marketing plan. Without it, you will find it harder to “sell” your book to agents, editors and readers. Here are a few thoughts of how to create an excellent one:

 

 

Introduce your main character(s). Use the names they’ll go by in your book. Keep it simple. Unless it’s absolutely necessary, you don’t need to go into detail about their personality.

character free

Reveal the genre. Again keep it brief. Set the tone or mood of the book. Mystery? Romance? Sci-fi? Thriller?

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Reveal the main conflict. Most books have subplots but they won’t need (usually) to be mentioned here. In one sentence show the problem. Will the detective be able to find the thief? Can the hero save the heroine’s life (or vise versa 🙂 ) etc. Many times this will begin with one of these words:  Until. But. However.

problem-free

Hook the reader’s curiosity.  Is all lost when another man shows up and does what the hero should have done? Is the detective a failure because his main suspect turns out to be innocent?

curious free

Give the reader a hopeful possible. This “longshot” will give your reader hope that all is not lost and keep them reading.

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Book blurbs should not be too long nor too short. Fifty words at most; Twenty-five to thirty words is a perfect sized blurb. Keep to these main facts, edit and you should have a winner. 

Happy Writing!

 

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List of 35 Must Read Young Adult Fiction

Many of the books on most Young Adult reading lists are not acceptable for a Christian teen or preteen to read because of the content. Here is my must read YA list. YA consist of books for ages 10 – 18, so it has a wide span. This list doesn’t consist only of Christian books, but they all have Christian principles or a Christian worldview. Because each parent’s standards are different, I’ll leave it to you which books your teen should read and at what age each book is appropriate. I’ve listed them in order of what I consider age appropriate.

Pipi Longstocking Series by Astrid Lindgren

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

Little House on the Prairie Series by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carrol

Anne of Greene Gables Series by LM Montgomery

Chronicles of Narnia Series by CS Lewis

A Wrinkle in Time Series by Madeleine L’Engle

Wizard of Oz Series by L. Frank Baum

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

William Henry is a Fine Name and I’ve Seen Him in the Watchfires by Cathy Gohlke

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Silas Marner by George Eliot

Crazy Dangerous by Andrew Klavin

The Ranger’s Apprentice Series by John Flanagan

The Hagenheim Series by Melanie Dickerson

If We Survive by Andrew Klavin

The Giver Series by Lois Lowry

Diary of Anne Frank (non-fiction, but still a good book)

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Christy by Catherine Marshall

The Call of the Wild by Jack London

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Homelanders Series by Andrew Klavin

The Lost Books Series by Ted Dekker

Watershed Down by James Ashton

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Outsiders by SE Hinton

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

The Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

100 Must Read Works of Fiction

by Tamera Lynn Kraft

I’ve seen a lot of lists of books everyone should read before they died. Many times I was disappointed certain books weren’t on the list or that other books were. I decided to make my own fiction list everyone should read. It is in alphabetical order according to title. Comment how many of these you’ve read and if you think I should have added any.

  1. 1984 by George Orwell
  2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  3. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
  5. Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt
  6. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  7. Animal Farm by George Orwell
  8. Anne of Green Gables Series by LM Montgomery
  9. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
  10. Atonement by Ean McEwan
  11. Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
  12. Grimm’s Fairy Tales by Willhelm Grimm
  13. And Then There were None by Agatha Christie
  14. Atlas Shrugged by Ann Rand
  15. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  16. Christie by Catherine Marshall
  17. Circle Series by Ted Dekker
  18. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  19. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  20. Emma by Jane Austin
  21. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  22. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  23. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  24. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  25. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  26. Hind’s Feet in High Places by Hannah Hurnard
  27. His Brother’s Keeper by Charles M. Sheldon
  28. Hondo by Louis L’Amour
  29. Hounds of the Baskervilles by Sir Author Conan Doyle
  30. In His Steps by Charles M. Sheldon
  31. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  32. Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne
  33. Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
  34. Left Behind Series by Jerry Jenkins and Tim LaHaye
  35. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
  36. Little House on the Prairie Series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  37. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  38. Love Comes Softly by Janette Oke
  39. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  40. Magnificent Obsession by Lloyd C Douglas
  41. Mark of the Lion Series by Francine Rivers
  42. Much Ado about Nothing by William Shakespeare
  43. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
  44. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  45. Persuasion by Jane Austin
  46. Piercing the Darkness by Frank Peretti
  47. Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan
  48. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin
  49. Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers
  50. Riven by Jerry Jenkins
  51. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  52. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  53. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austin
  54. Shane by Jack Schaefer
  55. Silas Marner by George Elliot
  56. South Pacific by James A. Michener
  57. Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  58. Tell Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe
  59. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  60. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  61. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
  62. The Book of Virtues by William J. Bennett
  63. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  64. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  65. The Cantebury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
  66. The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  67. The Chronicles of Narnia Series by CS Lewis
  68. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas
  69. The Covenant by Beverly Lewis
  70. The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry
  71. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  72. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  73. The Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins
  74. The Lord of the Rings Series by  J. R. R. Tolkien
  75. The Hobbit by  J. R. R. Tolkien
  76. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
  77. The Lottery by Shirley Jackson
  78. The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
  79. The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allen Poe
  80. The Outsiders by SE Hinton
  81. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  82. The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene
  83. The Ranger’s Apprentice Series by John Flannigan
  84. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  85. The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis
  86. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  87. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  88. The Time Machine by HG Wells
  89. The Virginian: The Horseman on the Plains by Owen Wister
  90. This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti
  91. To Build a Fire by Jack London
  92. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  93. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Sevenson
  94. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
  95. Twice Told Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  96. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Tubman
  97. War of the Worlds by HG Wells
  98. Watership Down by Richard Adams
  99. When the Heart Calls by Cindy Woodsmall
  100. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

My Favorite Top 10 Classic Romances and Love Stories

Old books on table on brown backgroundby Tamera Lynn Kraft

It’s almost Valentine’s Day when our thought turn to romance and love. There’s nothing better on Valentine’s Day than to pull out some of your favorite love stories. Here are my favorite classic romances and love stories.

10. Persuasion by Jane AustinWritten as the Napoleonic Wars were ending, the novel examines how a woman can at once remain faithful to her past and still move forward into the future. Anne Elliot seems to have given up on present happiness and has resigned herself to living off her memories. More than seven years earlier she complied with duty: persuaded to view the match as imprudent and improper, she broke off her engagement to a naval captain with neither fortune, ancestry, nor prospects. However, when peacetime arrives and brings the Navy home, and Anne encounters Captain Wentworth once more, she starts to believe in second chances.

9. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (All right. Technically it’s a play. But it’s still one of the greatest love stories of all times.)

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare creates a violent world, in which two young people fall in love. It is not simply that their families disapprove; the Montagues and the Capulets are engaged in a blood feud.

In this death-filled setting, the movement from love at first sight to the lovers’ final union in death seems almost inevitable. And yet, this play set in an extraordinary world has become the quintessential story of young love. In part because of its exquisite language, it is easy to respond as if it were about all young lovers.

8. A Farewell To Arms by Ernest Hemingway

A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep.

7. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

With these words, the reader is ushered into an isolated gray stone mansion on the windswept Cornish coast, as the second Mrs. Maxim de Winter recalls the chilling events that transpired as she began her new life as the young bride of a husband she barely knew. For in every corner of every room were phantoms of a time dead but not forgotten—a past devotedly preserved by the sinister housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers: a suite immaculate and untouched, clothing laid out and ready to be worn, but not by any of the great house’s current occupants. With an eerie presentiment of evil tightening her heart, the second Mrs. de Winter walked in the shadow of her mysterious predecessor, determined to uncover the darkest secrets and shattering truths about Maxim’s first wife—the late and hauntingly beautiful Rebecca.

6. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Grown-up Meg, tomboyish Jo, timid Beth, and precocious Amy. The four March sisters couldn’t be more different. But with their father away at war, and their mother working to support the family, they have to rely on one another. Whether they’re putting on a play, forming a secret society, or celebrating Christmas, there’s one thing they can’t help wondering: Will Father return home safely?

5. Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy

The year is 1792. The French Revolution, driven to excess by its own triumph, has turned into a reign of terror. Daily, tumbrels bearing new victims to the guillotine roll over the cobbled streets of Paris.… Thus the stage is set for one of the most enthralling novels of historical adventure ever written.

The mysterious figure known as the Scarlet Pimpernel, sworn to rescue helpless men, women, and children from their doom; his implacable foe, the French agent Chauvelin, relentlessly hunting him down; and lovely Marguerite Blakeney, a beautiful French exile married to an English lord and caught in a terrible conflict of loyalties—all play their parts in a suspenseful tale that ranges from the squalid slums of Paris to the aristocratic salons of London, from intrigue on a great English country estate to the final denouement on the cliffs of the French coast.

4. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Lockwood, the new tenant of Thrushcross Grange, situated on the bleak Yorkshire moors, is forced to seek shelter one night at Wuthering Heights, the home of his landlord. There he discovers the history of the tempestuous events that took place years before; of the intense relationship between the gypsy foundling Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw; and how Catherine, forced to choose between passionate, tortured Heathcliff and gentle, well-bred Edgar Linton, surrendered to the expectations of her class. As Heathcliff’s bitterness and vengeance at his betrayal is visited upon the next generation, their innocent heirs must struggle to escape the legacy of the past.

3. Jane Erye by Charlotte Bronte

A novel of intense power and intrigue, Jane Eyre has dazzled generations of readers with its depiction of a woman’s quest for freedom. Having grown up an orphan in the home of her cruel aunt and at a harsh charity school, Jane Eyre becomes an independent and spirited survivor-qualities that serve her well as governess at Thornfield Hall. But when she finds love with her sardonic employer, Rochester, the discovery of his terrible secret forces her to make a choice. Should she stay with him whatever the consequences or follow her convictions, even if it means leaving her beloved?

2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is a novel of manners by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story follows the main character, Elizabeth Bennet, as she deals with issues of manners, upbringing, morality, education, and marriage in the society of the landed gentry of the British Regency. Elizabeth is the second of five daughters of a country gentleman living near the fictional town of Meryton in Hertfordshire, near London. Page 2 of a letter from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra (11 June 1799) in which she first mentions Pride and Prejudice, using its working title First Impressions. Set in England in the early 19th century, Pride and Prejudice tells the story of Mr and Mrs Bennet’s five unmarried daughters after the rich and eligible Mr Bingley and his status-conscious friend, Mr Darcy, have moved into their neighborhood. While Bingley takes an immediate liking to the eldest Bennet daughter, Jane, Darcy has difficulty adapting to local society and repeatedly clashes with the second-eldest Bennet daughter, Elizabeth.

1. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…’

Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities portrays a world on fire, split between Paris and London during the brutal and bloody events of the French Revolution. After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille the aging Dr Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There, two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette. From the tranquil lanes of London, they are all drawn against their will to the vengeful, bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror and soon fall under the lethal shadow of La Guillotine.

Next Wednesday I’ll list my favorite contemporary love stories and romances. Which are your favorites? Would you add any? Please comment.

New Books on the Block

By Carole Brown

One of the best moments in an author’s life is when a book of theirs releases. And probably one of the top pleasures it gives those who love to encourage, is to share the reward of a new book out from a fellow-author-friend. 

Today I want to share with you some new books that recently released and hope you’re intrigued enough to check them out! Here goes…

coloring-journal

 

Coloring Journal. Author: Sharon A. Lavy.

Why should you buy this book?

  • Throughout history, successful people have kept journals.
  • Writing letters and keeping a diary is an ancient tradition that dates back to 10th century Japan.coloring-journal3

 

  • We now know that journaling has a positive impact on our physical and mental well-being, and modern psychologists contend that regular journaling strengthens the immune cells.
  • Many artistic types swear that three pages a day of free writing by hand boost their creativity.

 

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  • Couple that with the accepted benefits of coloring for calming stress relief and we recognize the usefulness of providing a combination coloring journal.
  • As you fill the following pages with your thoughts and your unique style of expression, please dwell on the goodness of the creator and His great love for us.

Remember, Sharon has a many Adult Coloring Books for your pleasure and relaxation. Do check them out here: 

Sharon A. Lavy’s Amazon Books

 

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Designing a Business Plan for Your Writing (Writing to Publish Book 1)

Why should you buy this book? 

  • Do you see yourself as a writer?
  • Is your dream to publish?

Designing a Business Plan for Your Writing helps you create a map you can follow to make your dream come true. The examples, reflective assignments, and challenges walk each reader through the process of constructing a thoughtful and achievable plan. While the handbook offers examples of structure, it is in no way formulaic. The plan you design to be a published author is customized to fit your personality traits, your specific gifts, and your busy life.

Check it out HERE:

Rebecca W. Water’s Amazon Book

THERE you have it! Some books to catch your attention this month! Enjoy.

Top 10 Classic Christmas Stories of All Time

Stack of books and other presents in basket. Christmas decoratioby Tamera Lynn Kraft

After all the decorations are put up and the cookies are baked and the presents are wrapped than to sit down with a classic Christmas story that you remember from your childhood Christmases. Here are my top 10 favorite classic Christmas stories of all time.

10. Christmas Day In the Morning by Pearl S. Buck: A classic tale about how showing love to the people closet to us is the most important Christmas gift we could ever give. You can read it online at this link.

9. The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg: This newer classic tells a story about a boy learning the importance of belief. Every year, hundreds of children are taking train rides across the country because of this story. A couple of years ago, I took the same train ride with my grandchildren. The first thing they did when the got home was too hand their bells on the Christmas tree.

8. The Little Match Stick Girl by Hans Christian Anderson: This is such a sad tear jerker about a poor little girl who gets to have the Christmas of her dreams. I remember the first time I read it as a young girl. The story stuck with me. To this day, I believe I am more charitable to those who have nothing partly because of this story. Don’t read it unless you have tissues handy.

7. The Other Wise Man by Henry Van Dyke: The wise man who didn’t make it to birth of Christ in time finds out why Jesus really came to Earth. I remember reading this in Junior High School and how it brought alive the Christmas story in my heart.

6. How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss: Before the movie with Jim Carey and before the cartoon we watched every Christmas season, there was this great story book written by Dr. Seuss. “Maybe Christmas,” he thought, “doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas…perhaps…means a little bit more!” Who could ever forget this line from this classic story?

5. The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry: The best Christmas romance ever written. It shows how we sacrifice for the ones we love. I remember thinking when I first read this as a young girl that if I found a romance like this, I had found true love. Now that I’m an adult who has been married for many years, I’d have to say that I have found true love like this.

4. Twas the Night Before Christmas by Clement C. Moore: This original story about Santa Claus was a poem originally called A Visit from Saint Nicholas. It was originally printed in 1823 and has served to establish our modern version of Santa Claus. It also is the first time the eight reindeer were actually named. I doubt those same 8 reindeer are still living, but maybe their descendants were named similarly. Since Rudolf didn’t appear until a story book was written about him in 1939, obviously this happened before Rudolf saved the day.

3. The Tale of Three Trees by Author Unknown: This folklore story tells about three trees who served a great purpose. The first tree wanted to hold the greatest treasure in the world. The second tree wanted to be a strong ship for mighty kings. The third tree wanted to be the tallest tree in the forest. Each tree thought it’s wish didn’t come true, but in reality, each tree ended up fulfilling its purpose in a way it never imagined. Angela Hunt wrote a novel based on this story.

2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens: This story of repentance set at Christmas times is the best Christmas story other than the real story in the Bible. Scrooge is a mean stingy old man who is visited by three spirits where he learns the true meaning of Christmas. This story has been made into many movie adaptations, but the original novel is far better than any of them because it shows Scrooge’s redemption from the first visit. By the time the ghost of Christmas future visits, Scrooge is a changed man.

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1. The Nativity Story:  This is the story of Christmas. Without Christ being born in Bethlehem, this would be a very dark world.

(Luke 2:1-21)

In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to their own town to register.

So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no guest room available for them.

And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.”

Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, “Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.”

When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let’s go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.”

So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.

On the eighth day, when it was time to circumcise the child, he was named Jesus, the name the angel had given him before he was conceived.

I Recommend . . . Three Books!

I recently had the privilege of recommending several books for various authors. Here’s a few I’m recommending:

Wicked Disregard by Barbara Ann Derksen

About the book:

Pedophiles and prostitutes, the last thing Christine Smith envisioned when she embarkedCD front of book copy on a career to find missing children. Will she end her work as an investigator and run the company left to her by her dead Father?
 
Now she’s been shot! How does her growing relationship with God change her outlook on life? Christine and Jeremy follow the clues in this, the third book in the Finders Keepers mystery series. In Wicked Disregard, they unravel a ring of vicious pedophiles while Christine continues to search for the identity of the man who ordered the death of her parents.
Buy her book here:

 

Barbara writes intense suspense and will keep you on your toes (figuratively speaking!) Just my type of reading, and I’d love to encourage you to give her books a chance! Here’s my review:

My Review:

Wicked Disregard by Barbara A. Derksen

You like drama? Intense? Real life issues addressed in your novels? Then you’re going to love Wicked Disregard. Be prepared to adjust to the many characters and be sure to read the previous books. You won’t regret it and reading them will place you firmly in this novel.

Derksen has the talent to draw a reader into her books by creating characters that are real and human, meaning they face problems and situations the same as ordinary people. You won’t be able to ignore the serious issues Christine and Jeremy face, and in dealing with them, you’ll be sitting on the edge of your seat and turning the pages as quickly as you can.

A childhood victim of crime, Christine must delve deep behind the clues to find the perpetrators of this case of child kidnapping, and the problem is she’s looking in places that she shouldn’t have to: law offices and police stations. She can’t let it go. With the help of her friend, Jeremy, she’s determined to close the case and handle her own personal problems too.

Of course, a thread of romance between the two main characters lighten the tenseness in the book, and the ray of God’s inspirational help gives hope to the hopeless and help to those who call on him.

It’s not a book for the timid, for those who insist on hiding their head in the sand of life. But those who do read it will find their eyes opened to this tragedy for children. It will give hearts the encouragement needed to lift in prayer similar real issues of the same situations.

Recommended highly!

Buy her book here:
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SECOND CHANCES by Cleo Lampos

About the Book:

Zoey Pappas grew up in a one-stoplight town. Now she’s landed her dream job as the fifth gradeSecond Chances teacher at the urban Diamond Projects School, but can she handle it?

  • Her family laid odds that she won’t. Zoey knows her cows, but she’s never dealt with students from drug-infested, crime-ridden communities.
  • Her Greek family wants her to work in the family restaurant and earn her M.R.S. degree. Zoey wants to prove herself, but she has met a muscled Irish cop who has been assigned to work with her as the Drug Awareness officer. He’s too efficient, to cocky, and too… handsome.

Ever since Officer Gavien Corrigan pulled Zoey’s car over on her first day of school for driving on a one way street in a neighborhood known for violence, he’s been captivated by her. Thoughts of the new teacher crowd in with the family responsibilities that overshadow his life. His bullet proof vest is lighter than the secret blame he carries on his shoulders. He believes that God is in control of lives, but sometimes wonders if God has forgotten him.

As the two are thrust together in the concrete jungle where everyone needs second chances, will Zoey and Gavin find their own second chances…together?

Zoey learns of unconditional love as she becomes friends with Carole Milner and her husband who is wheelchair bound with multiple sclerosis. As she watches the couple cope with MS, Zoey desires to fall in love like them. Multiple sclerosis does not define their relationship, love does.

A deaf student is mainstreamed into Zoey’s class, so she enters the world of the deaf and hard of hearing. It moves Zoey to deeper compassion for the parents and foster parents in her classroom.

Anyone who has been a teacher, or loves children will enjoy this romance that brings the country girl into the urban scene. A fresh look at chaplains working in jail ministry, drug rehab and foster care are included in this novel set in the inner city. The influence of Greek immigrant ideas are also explored.

Will Zoey make it in the big city?

Buy her book here:

Amazon

 

What a mixup of wonderful (in a manner of speaking) topics to explore in this book! Draws a reader right in.

MY REVIEW:

Second Chances by Cleo Lampas

You want something above the normal reading? Something unique and interesting to boot that will entertain and yet jerk you upright with its attention-grabbing chapters? Then pick up a copy of Second Chances.

From the first page, Cleo hooked me. With no glamour in the telling, dealing with a wide-spread problem in the states, this book will make even the toughest readers sit up and take notice.

Predictions of dire happenings from her hometown friends and family ring in her mind, as a young, inexperienced, naiveté teacher, lost in the middle of drug streets of a big city is stopped by a policeman, Gavin Corrigan, who seems to find her dilemma amusing. Unprepared for what greets her on her first day of teaching in one of inner-city Chicago’s poorer schools, Zoey’s expectations of her students reactions, her dreamy ideas of how to approach these world-weary young kids are soon only torn strips of what she’d hoped for her first day.

But Zoey’s yearning heart to help her students overcome their home life and personal struggles is inspiring as she reaches out to those in need around her. Her work with the deaf students is touching and a vital part of the novel. Her caring heart is revealed when she helps a fellow-teacher whose husband has MS.

One of the most heart-rending plots in the story is Gavin’s heartache at his brother’s drug addiction. Many times a hopeless, never-ending situation, it leaves the loved one filled with worry, sadness and a weary hope for the addicted.

And, yes, there is romance and hope and trust in God. Touches that bring a ray of sunshine into a story that deals with pertinent and deep topics. Truly a novel that needs to be read. Well done, Cleo Lampos!

Buy her book here:

Amazon

 

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Roots of Irish Wisdom by Cindy Thomson
About the Book:Irish Wisdom
This collection of classic Irish wisdom—in the form of stories, prayers, and proverbs—reveals the Creator in the natural world and highlights the importance of the Celtic spiritual heritage. Along with historical background on St. Patrick, St. Brigid, St. Columcille, and the Twelve Apostles of Erin, Cindy Thomson leads the reader on an enriching journey through Celtic learning and prayer.
Buy the book here:
I was particularly attracted to reading this nonfiction book for two reasons.
  • The first because I’ve always wanted to see Ireland with my own eyes. I loved their beautiful country, the people’s strength and their history.
  • The second reason was because of Cindy Thomson. She’s a sweet, talented friend whom I admire tremendously!

 

My Review:
Roots of Irish Wisdom by Cindy Thomson
Fascinating read. If you love history, and specifically Irish history, you’ll love this book. Thomson does a great job of telling the story details of past Irish saints, of the readiness of Ireland for learning about Christ, and providing pictures to whet your interest. Ireland’s always been a drawing to me, a place of strong wills and strong passions, and this detailed book is just the thing! I heartily recommend it if you’re serious about digging a bit deeper into the ancient history of the land. My honest opinion is given here by no coercion or expectancy by said author.
Buy the book here:
So there you have it.
Three fascinating books to whet your appetite
and encourage you to read this month of June! 
Enjoy!