This Week in History 1/9 – 1/15

HistoryThis Week in History

January 9:

  • US Civil War: A Union merchant ship, the Star of the West, is fired upon as it tries to deliver supplies to Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina (1861)
  • Apple Inc CEO Steve Jobs announces the iPhone (2007)
  • US Civil War: Mississippi secedes from the Union (1861)
  • WW2: US soldiers led by Gen Douglas MacArthur invade Philippines (1945)
  • Ed Martin, missionary to Japan and founder of a prison ministry, became born again in prison (1944)
  • Daguerrotype photo process announced at French Academy of Science (1839)
  • US Supreme Court strikes down Dallas’ ordinance imposing strict zoning on sexually oriented businesses (1990)
  • Semi-automatic rifles adopted by US army (1936)
  • First hot-air balloon flight in the US lifts off in Philadelphia (1793)
  • The Great Gale of 1880 devastates parts of Oregon and Washington with high wind and heavy snow (1880)
  • St. Philip of Moscow, primate of the Russian Orthodox Church, was murdered by Czar Ivan IV – Ivan the Terrible (1569)
  • Anson Jones, the last President of the Republic of Texas, commits suicide (1858)
  • After 140 years of unofficial racial discrimination, the Mormons issued an official statement declaring that blacks were not yet to receive the priesthood “for reasons which we believe are known to God, but which He has not made fully known to man.” (1970)
  • Abigail Van Buren’s Dear Abby column first appears in newspapers (1956)

January 10:

  • US Revolutionary War: Common Sense Pamphlet by Thomas Paine, published advocating American independence (1776)
  • UN headquarters opens in Manhattan, New York (1951)
  • Inauguration of the League of Nations held in Paris (1920)
  • US Civil War: US forts & property seized by Mississippi (1861)
  • US Civil War: Florida secedes from the Union (1861)
  • US Senate proposes female suffrage (1878)
  • Oil discovered in Texas (1901)
  • John D. Rockefeller incorporates Standard Oil (1870)
  • Poets Elizabeth Barrett & Robert Browning begin corresponding (1845)
  • The first section of the Complutensian Polyglot, the world’s first multi-language Bible, was printed at Alcala, Spain (1514)
  • U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall prayed, “May we resolve, God helping us, to be part of the answer, and not part of the problem.” (1947)
  • Louisiana slaves rebel in 2 parishes (1811)
  • King Charles I & family flee London for Oxford (1642)
  • Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon, signaling the start of civil war (49 BC)

January 11:

  • First public demonstration of telegraph message sent using dots & dashes at Speedwell Ironworks, Morristown, New Jersey by Samuel Morse and Alfred Vail (1838)
  • First government report warning by US Surgeon General reports that smoking may be hazardous (1964)
  • The Church of God, headquartered today in Cleveland, Tennessee, and with roots going back to 1886, officially adopts its current name (1907)
  • WW2: In Hamburg, Germany, the Altona Confession was issued by area pastors, offering Scriptural guidelines for the Christian life, in light of the confusing political situation and the developing Nazi influence on the State Church (1933)
  • Timothy Dwight, grandson of Jonathan Edwards and Yale President who brought revival to the college, died (1817)
  • Amelia Earhart flies from Hawaii to California (1935)
  • Insulin first used to treat diabetes (1922)
  • Elizabeth Blackwell becomes first woman in US to earn medical degree (1849)
  • President Theodore Roosevelt makes Grand Canyon a national monument (1908)
  • First pineapples planted in Hawaii (1813)
  • US Civil War: Alabama secedes from Union (1861)

January 12:

  • Governor John Winthrop, leader of the Puritans and first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, was born (1588)
  • Earthquake occurs in Haiti killing 230,000 and destroying the majority of the capital Port-au-Prince (2010)
  • Record blizzard struck Midwest killing over 100 (1979)
  • WW2: German forces in Belgium retreat in Battle of Bulge (1945)
  • Dr. Victor Rambo, medical missionary to India who cured the eyesight of thousands there, sailed for India (1924)
  • Romania bans Communist party – first Warsaw Pact member to do so (1990)
  • Gustav I of Sweden “father of the nation” crowned King of Sweden (1528)
  • All in the Family premieres on CBS featuring first toilet flush on TV (1971)
  • Josef Dzhugashvili signs himself as Stalin “man of steel” in a letter to the paper, Social Democrat (1913)
  • FBI arrests 6 members of the Great Brink’s robbery gang, 6 days before statute of limitations runs out (1956)
  • US Congress recognizes independence of Philippines (1933)
  • “Batman”, starring Adam West as Batman, Burt Ward as Robin, and Cesar Romero as The Joker, debuts on ABC (1966)

January 13:

  • Henry Ford patents a method of constructing plastic auto bodies (1942)
  • The world’s first hymnbook was published in Prague (1501)
  • Congress changes US flag to 15 stars & 15 stripes (1794)
  • Mickey Mouse comic strip first appears (1930)
  • NASA select its first American women astronauts (1978)
  • Anthony Foss patents accordion (1854)
  • Birth of Philip Jacob Spener, founder of German pietism (1635)
  • Mary Slessor, a world-famous missionary to Nigeria who ended many of the abuses there, died (1915)
  • Galileo Galilei discovers Callisto, 4th satellite of Jupiter (1610)
  • The Act of Multipliers is passed by the English Parliament forbidding alchemists to use their knowledge to create precious metals (1404)
  • Death of George Fox, English founder of the Society of Friends – Quakers (1691)
  • Humanist Society established in Hollywood, California (1929)
  • Odo, Count of Paris, becomes King of the Franks (888 AD)

January 14:

  • US Revolutionary War: US Congress of the Confederation ratifies the Treaty of Paris ending the war (1784)
  • Henry Ford introduces an assembly line for Model T (1914)
  • Nobel Prize-winning physician Albert Schweitzer is born (1875)
  • US Civil War: General Sherman begins his march to the South (1864)
  • First black selected for presidential cabinet – LBJ selects Robert C Weaver-HUD (1966)
  • Clarinet invented in Nuremberg, Germany (1690)
  • WW2: Hitler declares “Total War” (1943)
  • First Connecticut constitution, Fundamental Orders, adopted in Hartford (1639)
  • US Supreme court rules race separation on trains unconstitutional (1878)
  • George C Wallace sworn in as governor of Alabama, his address states “segregation now; segregation tomorrow; segregation forever!” (1963)
  • Juan de Valdes published Dialogue on Christian Doctrine which paved the way in Spain for the Protestant Reformation (1529)
  • Galileo Galilei discovers Callisto, 4th satellite of Jupiter (1610)
  • Mickey Mouse Comic Strip first appears (1930)
  • National Geographic Society founded (1888)
  • WW2: Taking advantage of the chaotic condition of Germany, Hitler stages a demonstration of 5000 storm troopers and denounces the ‘November crime’ (1923)
  • The Act of Multipliers is passed by the English Parliament forbidding alchemists to use their knowledge to create precious metals (1404)
  • Dr. William Brydon, a surgeon in the British Army during the First Anglo-Afghan War, becomes famous for being the sole survivor of an army of 16,500 when he reaches the safety of a garrison in Jalalabad (1842)

January 15:

  • Salem and the Massachusetts Bay Colony proclaimed a day of fasting and repentance before God for the tragic error and folly of the Salem witch trials (1697)
  • Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon lays siege to Jerusalem under Zedekiah’s reign (588 BC)
  • US Revolutionary War: Vermont, then known as People of New Connecticut, declare independence from England (1777)
  • Steam elevator patented by Elisha Otis (1861)
  • The Coca-Cola Company, then known as the Pemberton Medicine Company, is incorporated in Atlanta, Georgia (1889)
  • Tchaikovsky’s ballet Swan Lake premieres, St Petersburg (1895)
  • Israeli archaeologists reported uncovering the first evidence supporting the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. by military forces of the ancient Roman Empire (1970)
  • Vietnam War: President Nixon suspends all US offensive action in North Vietnam (1973)
  • US Revolutionary War: American Continental Congress establishes court of appeals (1780)
  • The University of Notre Dame was chartered under Roman Catholic auspices in Indiana (1844)
  • First top hat worn by John Etherington of London (1797)
  • Henry VIII declares himself head of the Church in England (1535)
  • Mt. Sinai Hospital was incorporated as the first Jewish hospital in the U.S. (1852)
  • Donkey first used as symbol of Democratic Party in Harper’s Weekly (1870)
  • While robbing the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indianapolis, Dillinger is shot several times by Officer William O’Malley, but survives because he is wearing a bullet proof vest (1934)
  • 4 Watergate burglars plead guilty in federal court (1973)
  • Elizabeth I crowned Queen of England in Westminster Abbey (1559)

This Week in History 1/2 – 1/8

HistoryThis Week in History

January 2:

  • WW2: 28 nations at war with Axis powers, pledge no separate peace deals (1942)
  • Future Foursquare Gospel church founder Aimee Elizabeth, known later as Aimee Semple McPherson, along with her husband Robert Semple, was ordained to the ministry in Chicago by evangelist William H. Durham (1909)
  • Free African American community of Philadelphia petitions US Congress to abolish the slave trade (1800)
  • President Theodore Roosevelt shuts down post office in Indianola, Mississippi for refusing to accept its appointed postmistress because she was black (1903)
  • WW2: Japanese troops occupy Manila Philippines (1942)
  • WW2: Allied air raid on Nuremberg (1945)
  • Martin Luther King Jr. begins a drive to register black voters (1965)
  • Pittsburgh’s Calvary Episcopal Church broadcasted the first religious service on radio (1921)
  • A team of Israeli scholars announced the discovery in Jerusalem of a 2,000-year-old skeleton of a crucified male, the first direct physical evidence of the well-documented Roman method of execution (1971)
  • First Jewish child born in Spain since 1492 expulsion (1966)
  • Alice Sanger becomes first female White House staffer (1890)
  • Responding to global fear of communism caused by the Russian Revolution and known as the Red Scare, US Attorney General Palmer authorizes raids across the country on unionists and socialists (1920)
  • Big Bottom Massacre in the Ohio Country marking the beginning of the Northwest Indian War (1791)
  • Willis Carrier receives a US patent for the world’s first air conditioner (1906)
  • Tsar Ivan the Terrible’s march to Novgorod begins (1570)

January 3:

  • A band of Russian Pentecostal Christians who being persecuted, led by Paul Vashchenko, overwhelmed the policeman at the gates of the American embassy and entered (1963)
  • WW2: 320 pastors of the German Confessing Church met to draw up a statement opposing the Nazi German Nationalist Church (1934)
  • Apple Computer, Inc incorporates (1977)
  • Alaska admitted as 49th US state (1959)
  • March of Dimes established to fight polio (1938)
  • US Civil War: Delaware legislature rejects proposal to join Confederacy (1861)
  • Construction begins on Brooklyn Bridge in New York (1870)
  • Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Catholic Church (1521)
  • WW2: Benito Mussolini dissolves Italian parliament/becomes dictator (1925)
  • Leonardo da Vinci unsuccessfully tests a flying machine (1496)
  • First patent list issued by US Patent Office (1872)
  • US Revolutionary War: General George Washington’s revolutionary army defeats British forces at Battle of Princeton, New Jersey (1777)
  • Stephen F. Austin receives a grant of land in Texas from the government of Mexico (1823)
  • First wax drinking straw patented by Marvin C Stone in Washington, D.C. (1888)
  • Solomon Northup is freed after 7 illegal years in slavery with aid of Washington Hunt, Governor of New York (1853)
  • First deep sea sounding (1840)

January 4:

  • WW2: Reich-bishop Müller issued a decree known as the “Muzzling Order” forbidding ministers to say anything in their sermons against the Nazi regime or teach against a superior Arian race. Although most churches complied, 320 ministers pledged support to the Confessing Church and stood against the Nazi regime. (1934)
  • Louis Braille, creator of Braille system of reading for the blind, was born (1809)
  • Nixon refuses to hand over tapes subpoenaed by Watergate Committee (1974)
  • Elvis Presley records a 10 minute demo in Nashville (1954)
  • The US Senate appointed Peter Marshall to be their chaplain (1947)
  • Samuel Colt sells his first revolver pistol to the United States government (1847)
  • Ferdinand of Austria, younger brother to Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, issued the first secular mandate forbidding the Anabaptist religious movement (1524)
  • Luna 1, Mechta, becomes first craft to leave Earth’s gravity (1959)
  • LBJ’s “Great Society” State of the Union Address (1865)
  • The New York Stock Exchange opens its first permanent headquarters at 10-12 Broad near Wall Street in New York City (1865)
  • Topsy the elephant is electrocuted by her owners at Luna Park, Coney Island and filmed by Edison Manufacturing movie company (1903)
  • Ralph Bunche appointed first black official in US State Department (1944)
  • Emilio G. Segrè and Carlo Perrier announce technetium, a previously unknown element and the first artificially synthesized chemical element (1947)
  • Utah becomes 45th US state (1896)
  • First elected Jewish governor, Moses Alexander, takes office in Idaho (1915)
  • Billboard magazine publishes its first music hit parade (1936)
  • King Charles I with 400 soldiers attacks the English parliament (1642)
  • Most of the Palace of Whitehall in London, the main residence of the English monarchs, is destroyed by fire (1698)
  • The New Apostolic Church is established in Germany (1863)

January 5:

  • Eight Methodist leaders, including Great Awakening preacher George Whitfield, gathered in South Wales to hold the first Calvinist Methodist Conference (1743)
  • Davy Crockett arrives in Texas, just in time for the Alamo (1836)
  • George Washington Carver, innovator of farming and former slave, died (1943)
  • Anabaptist reformer Felix Manz was drowned in punishment for preaching adult baptism, the first Protestant in history to be martyred at the hands of other Protestants (1527)
  • US Revolutionary War: British naval expedition led by Benedict Arnold burns Richmond, Virginia (1981)
  • US Civil War: 250 Federal troops are sent from New York to Ft Sumter (1861)
  • Following her divorce, popular American evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson resigned her denominational ordination and returned her fellowship papers to the Assemblies of God (1922)
  • Sudden extreme cold kills thousands of Europeans (1709)
  • First steamboat, Red River, sails (1859)
  • President Harry Truman labels his administration the “Fair Deal” (1949)
  • Eris, the largest known dwarf planet in the solar system, is discovered by the team of Michael E. Brown (2005)
  • WW2: National Socialist Party, Nazi, forms as German Farmers’ Party (1919)
  • FCC hears first transmission of FM radio with clear, static-free signal (1940)

January 6:

  • 3 Kings Day – the day celebrated as the day the wise men found Jesus (3 AD)
  • Last year the Church in Jerusalem observed the birth of Jesus on this date (548 AD)
  • Morse demonstrates the telegraph (1838)
  • New Mexico becomes 47th US state (1912)
  • Mother Teresa arrives in Calcutta to begin a her work among India’s poorest and diseased people (1929)
  • Pan American Airlines becomes the first commercial airline to schedule a flight, known as Pacific Clipper, around the world (1942)
  • President Franklin Roosevelt’s “4 Freedoms” speech, freedom from speech, worship, want and fear, during US State of Union address (1941)
  • Washington National Cathedral is chartered by Congress (1893)
  • Theodore Roosevelt dies (1919)
  • Mountain man Jedediah Strong Smith is born (1798)
  • Schoolhouse Rock premieres on ABC-TV with Multiplication Rock (1973)
  • King Harald of England crowned (1066)
  • Charles H. Spurgeon was converted in a Methodist chapel (1850)
  • Thomas Edison submits his last patent application (1931)
  • Daily newspaper comic strip Superman debuts (1939)
  • The English Rump Parliament votes to put Charles I on trial for treason and other “high crimes” (1649)

January 7:

  • First presidential election is held with George Washington (1798)
  • Isabella Thoburn, missionary and teacher to improvised women in India, arrived in India (1870)
  • Fire destroys Jamestown, Virginia (1608)
  • Galileo discovered four satellites of Jupiter with the aid of the newly invented telescope (1610)
  • US President Harry Truman announces American development of the hydrogen bomb (1953)
  • Fannie Farmer publishes her first cookbook (1896)
  • Typewriter patented by Englishman Henry Mill (1740)
  • Georgetown-IBM experiment, the first public demonstration of a machine translation system, is held in New York at the head office of IBM (1954)
  • Buck Rogers, first sci-fi comic strip, premieres (1929)
  • Tarzan comic strip premieres (1929)

January 8:

  • Missionaries to Ecuador, Ed McCulley, Nate Saint, Jim Elliot, Pete Fleming, and Roger Youderian, were martyred by Aucu (1956)
  • Youth for Christ organizes (1945)
  • In London, the first soup kitchens were opened for the relief of the poor (1800)
  • US President George Washington delivers first state of the union address (1790)
  • Black men granted the right to vote in Washington, D.C. despite President Andrew Johnson’s veto (1867)
  • Crazy Horse and his warriors fight their last battle with the United States Cavalry at Wolf Mountain (1877)
  • Columbus World’s fair in Chicago destroyed by fire (1894)
  • Severinus, missionary to Austria, died (482 AD)

This Week in History 12/26 – 1/1

HistoryThis Week in History:

December 26:

  • A 9.3 magnitude earthquake creates a tsunami causing devastation in Sri Lanka, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, the Maldives and many other areas around the rim of the Indian Ocean, killing 230,000 people. (2004)
  • First Spanish settlement La Navidad, modern Môle-Saint-Nicolas, in the New World is founded by Columbus (1492)
  • US Revolutionary War: General George Washington wins Battle of Trenton after surprise attack on Hessians that were dazed from too much Christmas celebrations (1776)
  • Plymouth Colony was settled by the Mayflower colonists (1620)
  • George Washington is eulogized by Colonel Henry Lee as “First in war, First in peace and First in hearts of his countrymen” (1799)
  • The crimes of Elizabeth Báthory, the most prolific female serial killer who murdered hundreds of young girls, are uncovered (1620)
  • WW2: Winston Churchill becomes first British Prime Minister to address a joint meeting of the US Congress warning that Axis would “stop at nothing” (1941)
  • Judy Garland

    Judy Garland, age 2½ and billed as Baby Frances, makes her show business debut (1924)

  • A theater fire in Richmond, Virginia kills the Governor of Virginia George William Smith and the president of the First National Bank of Virginia Abraham B. Venable (1811)
  • WW1: Government takes over US railroads for duration of the war (1917)

December 27:

  • Christian temperance leader Carry Nation raided and wrecked her first saloon in Medicine Lodge, Kansas (1899)
  • Radiation from an explosion on the magnetar SGR 1806-20 reaches Earth, the brightest extrasolar event known to have been witnessed on the planet (2004)
  • Spanish Crown issues the Laws of Burgos, governing the conduct of settlers with regards to native Indians in the New World (1512)
  • Flushing Remonstrance petition signed in the Dutch colony of New Netherland protesting ban on Quaker worship (1657)
  • First public railway using steam locomotive completed in England between Stockton and Darlington (1825)
  • WW2: President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders his secretary of war to seize properties belonging to the Montgomery Ward company because the company refused to comply with a labor agreement (1944)
  • Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie premieres at the Duke of York Theater in London (1904)
  • WW1: Great Poland Uprising against the Germans begins (1918)
  • Ether first used in childbirth in US (1845)
  • The World Bank was created with the signing of an agreement by 28 nations. (1945)
  • Radio City Music Hall opens (1932)

December 28:

  • Congress officially recognizes Pledge of Allegiance (1945)
  • Galileo observes the planet Neptune (1612)
  • World’s first commercial movie screened (1895)
  • US Revolutionary War: Thomas Paine is arrested in France for treason (1793)
  • Early signs of Ebola epidemic: 2 year old child in Guinea dies of an unidentified haemorraghic fever; mother, sister and grandmother soon follow (2013)
  • Harriet Tubman

    US Civil War: Harriet Tubman arrives in Auburn NY, on her last mission to free slaves, evading capture for 8 years on the Underground Railroad (1860)

  • William Finley Semple of Mount Vernon, Ohio patents chewing gum (1869)
  • First American test-tube baby, Elizabeth Jordan Carr, is born in Norfolk, Virginia (1981)
  • Korean War: Chinese troops cross 38th Parallel, into South Korea (1950)
  • American Colonization Society organizes (1816)
  • Spain recognizes independence of Mexico (1836)
  • Vladimir Putin signs into law a ban on US adoption of Russian children (2012)
  • U.S. immigration judge orders John Demjanjuk deported to Ukraine for crimes against humanity committed during World War II (2005)
  • Gulag Archipelago by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, a book about Stalin’s prison camps in central Asia, was published (1973)
  • Westminster Abbey dedicated (1065)

December 29:

  • Popular American hymnwriter Philip P. Bliss, song leader for DL Moody, died when the train in which he and his wife were riding plunged off a bridge into a ravine 60 feet below (1876)
  • Thomas Edison patents radio signals (1891)
  • First American Young Men’s Christian Association, YMCA, chapter opened in Boston Massachusetts. (1851)
  • Allen Yuan, Chinese preacher who was sentenced to life in prison for openly preaching the Gospel, was converted to Christianity (1936)
  • The Treaty of New Echota is signed, ceding all the lands of the Cherokee east of the Mississippi River to the United States (1835)
  • Texas admitted as 28th US state (1845)
  • Assassination inside Canterbury Cathedral of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury by followers of King Henry II (1170)
  • Life magazine ceases publication (1972)
  • Emma Snodgrass arrested in Boston for wearing pants (1852)
  • First telegraph ticker used by a brokerage house, Groesbeck & Co, NY (1867)
  • War of 1812: The USS Constitution under the command of Captain William Bainbridge, captures the HMS Java off the coast of Brazil after a three hour battle (1812)
  • War of 1812: British burn Buffalo, New York (1813)
  • Bowling ball invented (1862)

December 30:

  • Creation of the USSR formally proclaimed in Moscow from the Bolshoi Theatre (1922)
  • International Church of the Foursquare Gospel, founded by evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, was incorporated in Los Angeles, California (1927)
  • Vatican recognizes Israel (1993)
  • John Wycliffe, Bible scholar and translator, died (1384)
  • Astronomer Edwin Hubble formally announces existence of other galactic systems at meeting of the American Astronomical Society (1924)
  • Vietnam War: President Nixon halts bombing of North Vietnam & announces peace talks (1972)
  • Abraham Mills’ commission declares Abner Doubleday invented baseball (1907)
  • Electric arc lamp sets fire to Iroquois theater in Chicago leaving 602 dead in one of the deadliest blazes in American history (1903)
  • Wearing masks at balls forbidden in Boston (1809)
  • Filipino nationalist José Rizal is executed by firing squad in Manila by the Spanish (1896)
  • First picture of a comet from space (1973)
  • The lowest ever United Kingdom temperature of -27.2°C was recorded at Altnaharra in the Scottish Highlands (1995)

December 31:

  • Import of African slaves banned by all of the Northern US states (1783)
  • Birth of Peter Bohler, the Moravian missionary who influenced the religious spirit of John Wesley (1712)
  • WW2: President Harry Truman officially proclaims end of WW II (1946)
  • Charles Darrow patents Monopoly (1935)
  • Ellis Island New York City opens as a US immigration depot (1890)
  • Thomas Edison gives first public demonstration of his incandescent lamp (1879)
  • Times Square New Year’s Eve, 1904

    The first New Year’s Eve celebration is held in Times Square, then known as Longacre Square, in New York, New York. Ball drops for the first time. (1904)

  • First battery to convert radioactive energy to electricity announced (1951)
  • WW2: Italian Fascist Mussolini orders the suppression of opposition newspapers (1924)
  • US Civil War: President Lincoln signs act admitting West Virginia to the Union (1862)
  • US Revolutionary War: Battle of Quebec (1775)
  • Willem van Orange, leader of the Dutch Protestant revolt against Spain, demands freedom of conscience/religion (1564)
  • Brooklyn’s last day as a city, incorporates into New York City (1897)
  • Last San Francisco firehorses retired (1921)
  • Ratification of United Nations Charter completed (1945)
  • Bank of North America, first US bank, opens (1781)
  • British East India Company chartered (1600)
  • English astronomer James Bradley announces discovery of Earth’s nutation motion (1744)
  • Queen Victoria chooses Ottawa as new capital of Canada (1857)
  • The official opening of Taipei 101, the current tallest skyscraper in the world, standing at a height of 509 meters or 1,670 feet (2004)
  • 80,000 Vandals, Alans and Suebians cross the Rhine at Mainz beginning an invasion of Gallia (406 AD)
  • A window tax is imposed in England, causing many shopkeepers to brick up their windows to avoid the tax (1695)
  • Frisia/Groningen adopt Gregorian calendar, tomorrow is 1/12/1701 (1700)
  • End of French Republican calendar; France returns to Gregorianism (1805)

January 1:

  • Origin of Christian Era; first day in AD (1 AD)
  • New Year’s Day is celebrated on January 1 for the first time in history as Julian Calendar goes into effect (45 BC)
  • Agnes Ozman became the first recorded person in the 20th century to speak in tongues and was later involved with the Azuza Street Revival (1901)
  • US Civil War: Emancipation Proclamation issued by Lincoln to free slaves in confederate states (1863)
  • US Civil War: President-elect of the United States Abraham Lincoln declares slavery in Confederate states unlawful (1861)
  • US Revolutionary War: General George Washington hoists Continental Union Flag (1776)
  • US Revolutionary War: Mutiny of 1781 when 1,500 soldiers of the 6th Pennsylvania Regiment under General Anthony Wayne’s command rebel against the Continental Army’s winter camp in Morristown, New Jersey (1781)
  • War of 1812: Official reopening of the White House (1818)
  • US Civil War: First US income tax (1862)
  • New York City annexes the Bronx (1874)
  • Albany replaces NYC as capital of New York (1797)
  • William Lloyd Garrison publishes first issue of Abolitionist Journal (1831)
  • WW2: Emperor Hirohito of Japan announces he is not a god (1946)
  • First practical horse drawn fire engine in US enters service (1853)
  • Building of Panama Canal begins (1880)
  • Johnny Cash plays first of many free concerts behind bars (1960)
  • Haiti gains independence from France (1804)
  • Protestant Western Europe, except England, begin using Gregorian calendar (1700)
  • Quakers in Pennsylvania emancipate their slaves (1788)
  • Dr John H Watson is introduced to Sherlock Holmes (1881)
  • Wilhelm Röntgen announces his discovery of x-rays (1896)
  • First homestead under the Homestead Act claimed in Nebraska (1863)
  • Lincoln University, a black college, chartered (1854)
  • St. Basil, church leader who defied Roman Emperor Julian for turning his back on Christianity and refused to serve in his court, died (379 AD)
  • In Lexington, KY, 12,000 followers of Alexander Campbell called “Campbellites” merged with 10,000 followers of Barton W. Stone known as “Christians” to form the Disciples of Christ Christian Church (1832)
  • Portuguese navigators discover Rio de Janeiro (1502)
  • Last gladiator competition in Rome (404 AD)
  • Dutch East Indies Company dissolves (1800)

This Week in History 12/19 – 12/25

HistoryThis Week in History:

December 19:

  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens is published, 6,000 copies sold (1843)
  • Bill Wallace, missionary to China, was martyred by Chinese Communists soldiers (1950)
  • Benjamin Franklin under the name Richard Saunders begins publication of Poor Richard’s Almanack (1732)
  • US Revolutionary War: Thomas Paine published his first essay, in which he wrote, “These are the times that try men’s souls” (1776)
  • The United States House of Representatives forwards Articles I and III of impeachment against President Bill Clinton to the Senate because of the Lewinsky scandal (1998)
  • US Revolutionary War: General Washington settles his troops at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania for winter (1777)
  • WW2: Hitler takes complete command of German Army (1941)
  • First radio broadcast from space with President Eisenhower voice “To all mankind, America’s wish for Peace on Earth & Good Will to Men Everywhere” (1958)
  • Music Man opens at Majestic Theater NYC for 1375 performances (1957)
  • WW2: US Office of Censorship created to control info pertaining to the war (1941)
  • US recognizes independence of Hawaii (1842)
  • British Broadcasting Corp begins transmitting overseas (1932)
  • William Pitt the Younger becomes the youngest ever British Prime Minister at age 24 (1783)
  • Theresa Vaughn, 24, confesses in court in Sheffield, England, to being married 61 times over 5 years in 50 cities in three countries (1922)
  • South Carolina declares right of states to nullify federal laws (1828)
  • Georgia passes first US state birth registration law in US (1823)

December 20:

  • A revival broke out among the Shakers igniting a religious fervor among other denominations especially in Kentucky and other colonial frontier regions (1787)
  • Montgomery, Alabama removed race-based seat assignments on its buses (1956)
  • Virginia Company settlers leave London to establish Jamestown, Virginia (1606)
  • 14 republics form Union of Soviet Socialistic Republics – USSR (1922)
  • Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life starring James Stewart and Donna Reed premieres in New York (1946)
  • Bob Hope becomes an American citizen (1920)
  • French flag lowered in New Orleans to mark formal transfer of Louisiana Purchase from France to US for 27 million (1803)
  • Grimm’s Fairy Tales by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm is published (1812)
  • Civil War: South Carolina secedes from the Union (1860)
  • Vietnam War: National Front for the Liberation of Vietnam is formed (1960)
  • Harvey starring James Stewart premieres in New York (1950)
  • Phileas Fogg completes around world trip according to Jules Verne (1892)
  • Thomas Edison privately demonstrated incandescent light at Menlo Park (1879)
  • First successful US cotton mill to spin yarn in Rhode Island (1790)
  • Pneumatic automobile tire patented (1892)
  • WW2: World War II: First battle of the American Volunteer Group, better known as the Flying Tigers, in Kunming, China (1941)
  • Osmond brothers debut on Andy Williams Show (1962)
  • First state anti-lynching statute approved in Georgia (1893)
  • Elvis Presley given draft notice to join US Army for National Service (1957)
  • Archbishop Edmund Grindal  challenge Queen Elizabeth when she ordered him to squelch a Puritan movement in England (1576)
  • Missouri imposes a $1 bachelor tax on unmarried men between 21 & 50 (1820)
  • Civil War: Vicksburg Campaign begins (1862)
  • Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II becomes the oldest ever monarch of the United Kingdom, surpassing Queen Victoria, who lived for 81 years, 7 months and 29 days (2007)
  • Broadway lit by electricity, becomes known as “Great White Way” (1880)
  • Baldwin Institute, now known as Baldwin Wallace University, was founded (1845)

December 21:

  • 103 Mayflower pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock (1620)
  • French Scientists Pierre and Marie Curie discover radium (1898)
  • John Jay becomes first US Secretary of State (1784)
  • Apollo 8, Borman, Lovell & Anders, first manned Moon voyage (1968)
  • US Civil War: General Sherman conquers Savannah, Georgia (1864)
  • Fox Films signs Shirley Temple, age 5, to a studio contract (1933)
  • Walter L. Wilson, founder of Calvary Bible College and pioneer of Christian radio, was converted to Christianity (1896)
  • Martin Luther King Jr. and others sit in the new integrated bus (1956)
  • Flanders adopts Gregorian calendar, tomorrow is Jan 1 1583 (1582)
  • The first full-length animated feature film and the earliest in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, premieres at the Carthay Circle Theatre (1937)
  • J. Edgar Hoover deports anarchists/feminist Emma Goldman to Russia (1919)
  • Flying Down to Rio becomes Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers first movie together (1932)
  • Soviet Union formally dissolves as 11 of 12 republics sign treaty forming Commonwealth of Independent States (1991)
  • First game of basketball, based on rules created by James Naismith, played by 18 students in Springfield, Massachusetts (1891)
  • First crossword puzzle (with 32 clues) printed in NY World (1913)

December 22:

  • Schoenbrunn Village

    Schoenbrunn Village

    Moravian missionary constructs first schoolhouse west of Allegheny in Schoenbrunn Village, Ohio (1772)

  • Continental navy organized with seven ships (1775)
  • Romania ousts communist president Nicolae Ceausescu after police try to arrest a pastor and are stopped by a crowd that grows into a mob and marches to the palace, the first domino in the fall of the USSR (1989)
  • French officer Alfred Dreyfus court-martialed for treason, triggers worldwide charges of antisemitism. Dreyfus later vindicated. (1894)
  • Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony given world premiere in Vienna (1808)
  • Attendees at a prayer meeting for indigenous causes in the small village of Acteal in the Mexican state of Chiapas are massacred by paramilitary forces (1927)
  • Julie Nixon, daughter of President Nixon, and David Eisenhower, grandson of President Eisenhower, marry each other at the White House (1968)
  • Hugh McKail, a Covenanter preacher in Scotland, was martyred by being tortured and hung (1666)
  • Samuel Marsden of the Church Missionary Society arrives in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand to establish the country’s first mission station (1814)
  • John Hunt, first missionary to Fiji, arrived on the Fiji Islands (1836)
  • The execution of author Fyodor Dostoevsky is called off at the last second (1849)
  • The first U.S. commercial radio license assigned to a religious broadcaster was awarded to the National Presbyterian Church of Washington, D.C. (1921)
  • First string of Christmas tree lights created by Thomas Edison (1882)

December 23:

  • US Revolutionary War: General George Washington resigns his military commission as Commander-in-Chief of the Army to Congress (1783)
  • Visit from St Nicholas by Clement Moore published (1823)
  • US Revolutionary War: Thomas Paine writes “These are the times that try men’s souls” (1776)
  • Maryland votes to cede a 10 sqaure mile area for District of Columbia (1788)
  • US Revolutionary War: Benedict Arnold court-martialed for improper conduct (1779)
  • The first human kidney transplant is performed by Dr. Joseph E. Murray at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts (1954)
  • “Emma” By Jane Austen by published (1815)
  • Birth of Jean Francois Champollion, founder of modern Egyptology and man who successfully decoded the hieroglyphics of the Rosetta Stone (1790)
  • Philip of Moscow, leader of the Russian Church, was martyred for speaking out against Ivan the Terrible’s mass executions (1569)
  • English astronomer John Flamsteed observes Uranus without realizing it’s undiscovered (1690)
  • Under the future Emperor Nicephorus Phocas, Byzantine troops stormed city of Aleppo, recovering the tattered tunic of John the Baptist (1962)
  • Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh cuts off his left ear with a razor, and sends it to a prostitute for safe keeping (1888)
  • First Keystone Kops film, entitled Hoffmeyer’s Legacy (1912)
  • Birth of Robert Barclay, Scottish Quaker theologian (1648)
  • BBC Radio began daily newscasts (1922)

December 24:

  • Astronauts James A. Lovell, William Anders, and Frank Borman read passages from Genesis to the world as Apollo VIII became the first manned vehicle to circle the moon (1968)
  • Silent Night sung for the very first time at St. Nicholas Church in Austria (1818)
  • The Northside Tabernacle in Chicago was dedicated by evangelist Dwight L. Moody (1871)
  • Fire devastates US Library of Congress in Washington, destroys 35,000 volumes (1851)
  • Henry Ford completes his first useful petrolm fuelled engine (1893)
  • WW2: FDR appoints General Eisenhower supreme commander of Allied forces
  • US Civil War: Several Confederate veterans form Ku Klux Klan in Pulaski, Tennessee (1865)
  • Henry Ford completes his first useful petroleum fueled engine (1893)
  • War of 1812: The Treaty of Peace and Amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America is signed by British and American representatives at Ghent, Belgium, ending the war (1814)
  • Irving Fisher patents archiving system with index cards (1912)
  • Methodism was officially organized in the newly-independent United States of America (1784)
  • Americans remembered Iran hostages by shining lights for 417 seconds (1980)
  • WW1: German plane drops bombs on Dover England (1914)

December 25:

  • Christ was born according to calendar-maker Dionysius Exiguus (1 AD)
  • The first recorded celebration of Christmas (336 AD)
  • First known Christmas carol Silent Night, Holy Night sung in Austria (1818)
  • Handel’s Messiah, premieres in the US in Boston (1818)
  • US Revolutionary War: Washington crosses Delaware where he surprises and defeats 1,400 Hessians (1776)
  • WW1: Legendary Christmas Truce ceased fighting among enemies (1914)
  • Francis of Assisi assembles first Nativity scene Greccio, Italy (1223)
  • Bing Crosby sings White Christmas in public for the first time (1941)
  • The first successful trial run of the system which would become the World Wide Web (1990)
  • Montgomery Ward introduces Rudolph the 9th reindeer (1939)
  • US Civil War: President Andrew Johnson grants unconditional pardon to all persons involved in Southern rebellion (1868)
  • US Civil War: Christmas for Union soldier Elisha Hunt Rhodes, famous for his diary of the Civil War that span four years (1862)
  • Massachusetts General Court ordered a five shilling fine for “observing any such day as Christmas” (1651)
  • The Dunkards, German Baptists, held their first immersion service in America at Germantown, Pennsylvania (1723)
  • Physician Ephraim McDowell performs the first abdominal surgery in the U.S, an ovariotomy to remove a 22 lb ovarian tumor (1809)
  • First electrically-lit Christmas tree appeared in the White House while Calvin Coolidge was president (1923)
  • Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony forbids game playing on Christmas (1621)
  • Clovis, the first French Christian king, and 4,000 of his troops became Christians and were baptized (496 AD)
  • England adopts Julian calendar (597 AD)
  • Astronomer Anders Celsius introduces Centigrade temperature scale (1741)
  • Christmas Island founded and named by Captain William Mynors of the East India Ship Company vessel, the Royal Mary (1643)

This Week in History 12/5 – 12/11

HistoryThis Week in History

December 5:

  • Antibaptist Hans Schlaffer martyred for standing for the Gospel (1527)
  • US President Polk triggers Gold Rush of 1849 by confirming gold discovery in California (1848)
  • German physicist Albert Einstein granted a visa to enter America (1932)
  • Prohibition in US ends when 21st Amendment ratified and 18th Amendment repealed (1933)
  • US President Truman creates Committee of Civil Rights by Executive Order (1946)
  • 500 Jews of Nuremberg massacred during Black Death riots (1349)
  • Charlemagne becomes the sole King of the Franks after the death of his brother Carloman (771 AD)
  • Televangelist Jim Bakker was charged by a federal grand jury with mail fraud and conspiracy to defraud the public (1988)
  • The French Franc is created (1360)
  • Earthquake strikes Naples killing 35,000 (1856)

December 6:

  • St. Nicholas died (341 AD)
  • US Civil War: 13th Amendment of the United States Constitution is ratified, abolishing slavery (1865)
  • First recording made of the human voice – Thomas Edison reciting “Mary had a little lamb” (1877)
  • Washington Monument completed (1884)
  • NASA reveals photographs taken by Mars Global Surveyor suggesting the presence of liquid water on Mars (2006)
  • Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland for the second and and final time (1849)
  • Thomas Aquinas had a vision of Christ (1273)
  • Joseph H Rainey becomes first black in US House of Representatives (1870)
  • First edition of Encyclopedia Britannica published (1768)
  • Coal mine explosions in Monongah, West Virginia kill 361 (1907)
  • Everglades National Park in Florida is dedicated (1947)
  • U.S. Congress moves from New York City to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1790)
  • China votes for universal human rights (1912)
  • Several villagers are shot dead during protests in Dongzhou, China (2005)
  • First US Presidential address broadcast on radio by President Calvin Coolidge (1923)
  • Hugo Chávez is elected President of Venezuela (1998)
  • Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer first airs on TV (1964)
  • NASA reveals photographs taken by Mars Global Surveyor suggesting the presence of liquid water on Mars (2006)
  • Cokesbury College, the first Methodist college in America, was founded (1787)

December 7:

  • WW2: Imperial Japanese Navy with 353 planes attack US fleet at Pearl Harbor Naval Base, Hawaii killing 2,403 people and starting American involvement in World War 2 (1941)
  • Delaware becomes first state to ratify the US constitution (1787)
  • WW1: US becomes 13th country to declare war on Austria (1917)
  • Naturalist Alexander von Humboldt reports his discovery of the decrease in intensity of Earth’s magnetic field from the poles to the equator (1804)
  • Apollo 17, final manned lunar landing mission, launched (1972)
  • Microwave oven patented (1945)
  • The American Colony of Massachusetts suspended the Corporal Punishment Act of 1656 which had imposed harsh penalties on Quakers and other religious Nonconformists (1661)
  • At the Synod of Rome, Cyril of Alexandria formally condemned the doctrine which claimed there were two separate Persons in the Incarnate Christ – one Divine, the other Human (430 AD)
  • Emperor Lo-Yang in China sees supernova (185 AD)

December 8:

  • WW2: US declares war on Japan and enters war (1941)
  • WW2: Great Britain declares war on Japan (1941)
  • WW2: FDR makes famous date in infamy speech about Pearl Harbor attack (1941)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of student organizations holding religious services at public colleges and universities (1981)
  • George Washington’s retreating army crosses Delaware River from New Jersey possible only because an unusual fog covered the area (1776)
  • WW2: Dutch government-in-exile in London declares war on Japan (1941)
  • Ludwig Von Beethoven’s 7th Symphony in A premieres (1813)
  • US President Reagan & Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev sign a treaty eliminating medium range nuclear missiles (1987)
  • 114-day newspaper strike begins in New York City (1962)
  • US Civil War: Abraham Lincoln’s Amnesty Proclamation and plan for Reconstruction of South (1863)
  • Christmas seals were sold for the first time to fight tuberculous (1907)
  • US & USSR sign treaty to prohibit nuclear weapons in outer space (1966)
  • Pope Pius IX declared the Immaculate Conception of Mary an article of faith for the Catholic Church (1854)
  • Sister Anthony, known as the Angel of the Battlefield for her service to the wounded during the Civil War, passed away (1897)
  • Japanese military police launch violent suppression of the religious sect Oomoto for worshiping figures other than the emperor (1935)
  • US President Dwight D. Eisenhower gives his “Atoms for Peace” speech at the UN in New York (1966)

December 9:

  • WW2: Hitler orders US ships are to be torpedoed (1941)
  • WW2: China declares war on Japan, Germany & Italy (1941)
  • Robert Cushman preached first recorded and printed sermon on US soil (1621)
  • UN General Assembly unanimously approves Convention on Genocide (1948)
  • Scottish missionary explorer David Livingstone set sail on his first journey to Africa (1840)
  • WW2: First US WW II bombing mission in Far East, Luzon, Philippines (1941)
  • US Civil War: The Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War is established by the U.S. Congress (1861)
  • First Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) in North America (1851)
  • A Charlie Brown Christmas premieres (1965)
  • Alfred Tennyson’s poem Charge of the Light Brigade published (1854)
  • NLS, a system for which hypertext and the computer mouse were developed, is publicly demonstrated for the first time in San Francisco (1968)
  • Nicolae Ceaușescu becomes Communist President of Romania overthrown 1989 (1967)
  • Noah Webster establishes New York’s first daily newspaper, the American Minerva (1793)

December 10:

  • The Gift of the Magi, a short story by William Sydney Porter known as O. Henry, was first published (1905)
  • Wyoming becomes first US territory to grant women right to vote (1869)
  • Spanish-American War formally ended by the Treaty of Paris; US acquires Philippines, Puerto Rico & Guam (1898)
  • Martin Luther publicly burned papal edict demanding he recant (1520)
  • Isaac Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s laws from his theory of gravity, contained in the paper De motu corporum in gyrum, is read to the Royal Society by Edmund Halley (1684)
  • Kaspar Schwenkfeld, German theologian and reformer who influenced Anabaptist, Pietism, and Puritans, died (1561)
  • Massachusetts Bay becomes first American colonial government to borrow money (1690)
  • Italian archaeologist Antonio Bosio, known as Columbus of the Catacombs, first descended into the subterranean Christian burial chambers located under the streets of Rome (1593)
  • Nobel Peace Prize presented to Dr Martin Luther King Jr. in Oslo (1964)
  • US Civil War: General Sherman’s armies reach Savannah & 12 day siege begins (1864)
  • First Nobel Peace Prizes awarded to Jean Henri Dunant, Frederic Passy (1901)
  • Poet Emily Dickinson is born  (1830)
  • Nobel Prize for Physics awarded to Pierre and Marie Curie (1903)
  • Albert Schweitzer receives Nobel Peace Prize (1954)
  • Edward VIII signs Instrument of Abdication, giving up the British throne to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson (1936)
  • President Theodore Roosevelt becomes first American awarded Nobel Peace Prize (1906)
  • Ruyard Kipling receives Nobel prize for literature (1907)
  • First traffic lights are installed outside the Palace of Westminster in London (1868)
  • WW2: 2nd part of Hitler’s Mein Kampf published (1926)
  • 6-year old Donny Osmond’s singing debut on Andy Williams Show (1963)

December 11:

  • 103 Mayflower pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock (1620)
  • WW2: Germany & Italy declare war on USA (1941)
  • Myles Standish and a group of 18 settlers are attacked by 30 Native Americans, which became known as the “First Encounter” (1620)
  • Edward VIII becomes the first English monarch to voluntarily abdicate the throne after the Church of England condemns his decision to marry to Wallace Simpson, an American divorcee (1936)
  • WW2: Dutch government in London declares war on Italy (1941)
  • WW2: Japanese occupy Guam (1941)
  • WW2: Japanese attack Wake Island (1941)
  • WW2: New anti-Jewish measures proclaimed in Poland (1939)
  • English Puritans introduced the “Root and Branch” petition to Parliament demanding the English episcopacy, “with all its dependencies, roots and branches”, be abolished (1640)
  • First recorded display of Aurora Borealis in north American colonies (1790)
  • 13 black soldiers hanged for participation in Houston riot (1917)
  • Indiana becomes 19th US state (1816)
  • Colored moving pictures demonstrated at Madison Square Garden (1909)
  • Magnum P.I. premieres on CBS (1980)

This Week in History 11/28 – 12/4

HistoryThis Week in History

November 28:

  • Thanksgiving was first observed as a regular American holiday observed annually on the fourth Thursday in November (1863)
  • John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim’s Promise, was born (1628)
  • Ku Klux Klan trials began in Federal District Court in South Carolina (1871)
  • The Treaty of Hopewell is signed between the Confederation Congress of the United States of America and the Cherokee people (1785)
  • WW2: Dutch law professor Rudolph Clevering arrested by Nazis for protesting dismissal of Jewish colleagues (1940)
  • National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America was formed (1950)
  • A Dallas grand jury delivers a murder indictment against Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow for the January 1933 killing of Tarrant County Deputy Malcolm Davis (1933)
  • Ferdinand Magellan begins crossing Pacific Ocean (1520)
  • 492 die in a fire that destroyed Coconut Grove nightclub in Boston (1942)
  • William Shakespeare marries Anne Hathaway (1582)

November 29:

  • WW2: Passenger ship Lurline sends radio signal of sighting Japanese war fleet (1941)
  • John Hopkins hospital performs first open heart surgery (1944)
  • WW2: US rations coffee (1942)
  • The first surgery on a human to correct blue baby syndrome is performed by Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas (1944)
  • Saturninus dragged to death by a bull for refusing to renounce Christ (257 AD)
  • In Connecticut, Lemuel Haynes become the first black minister licensed to preach by a predominantly white denomination (1780)
  • Sir James Jay invents invisible ink (1775)
  • John Ray, father of Natural Science who classified plant life, was born (1627)
  • Crew of the slave ship Zong murder approximately 142 African slaves by dumping them into the sea in order to claim insurance. (1781)
  • Sand Creek Massacre, Colorado militia kills about 150 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians including Cheyenne chief One-Eye (1864)
  • Antioch in modern day Syria struck by Earthquake, about 250,000 die (526 AD)
  • The Massachusetts General Court issued a call for local pastors to learn the dialects of neighboring Indian tribes as an aid toward converting them to the Christian faith (1644)
  • UN Security Council approves US-sponsored resolution authorizing the use of force in the Persian Gulf if Iraq does not withdrawal from Kuwait by Jan. 15, 1991 (1990)
  • In Nagpur, India, six church bodies — the Anglicans, the United Church of Northern India, the Baptists, the Methodists, the Church of the Brethren and the Disciples of Christ — merged to form the Church of India (1970)
  • Actress Natalie Wood drowns (1981)

November 30:

  • US Revolutionary War: Britain signs agreement recognizing US independence (1782)
  • John Geddie, Canadian missionary, sailed for the island of Aneiteum in Polynesia. When he died, the people of Aneiteum made a tablet in his memory which said, “”When he landed in 1848, there were no Christians here, and when he left in 1872 there were no heathen.” (1848)
  • Spain cedes her claims to Louisiana Territory to France (1804)
  • Mark Twain was born as Samuel Clemens (1835)
  • Roman Catholicism was briefly restored to England under the reign of Mary Tudor “Bloody Mary” who had Thomas Cranmer, Hugh Latimer, Nicholas Ridley and nearly 300 other Protestant leaders burned at the stake (1554)
  • A German engineer patents front-wheel drive for automobiles (1900)
  • Beijing hit by Earthquake; about 100,000 die (1731)
  • 16,000 inhabitants of Venice died this month of plague (1630)

December 1:

  • WW2: Japanese emperor Hirohito signs declaration of war (1941)
  • Rosa Parks arrested for refusing to move to the back of bus and give her seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama (1955)
  • Titus Coan, Great Awakening preacher and missionary who established a mission church in Hawaii that grew to be the largest in the world, died after bringing 70% of the population to Christ (1882)
  • WW1: US requests that Germany withdraw its military and naval attaches from the Embassy in Washington (1915)
  • 12 nations sign treaty for scientific peaceful use of Antarctica (1959)
  • WW2: SS-Fuhrer Himmler begins deportation of Polish Jews (1939)
  • Boys Town founded by Father Edward Flanagan west of Omaha, Nebraska (1917)
  • The Great Train Robbery, the first Western film, released (1903)
  • Golden Gate Bridge closes due to high winds (1951)
  • Birth of Albert Barnes, American Presbyterian clergyman and Bible commentator (1798)
  • Erie Canal closes for entire month due to cold weather (1831)
  • Hans Christian Andersen publishes his first book of fairy tales (1835)
  • First White House telephone installed (1878)
  • Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for Bob Jones College (1909)

December 2:

  • Chanting “Allah is great”, anti-Shah protesters poured through Tehran, Iran (1978)
  • First permanent artificial heart successfully implanted (1982)
  • US President James Monroe declared the Monroe Doctrine US Policy which stated that further efforts by European nations to colonize land or interfere with states in North or South America would be viewed as acts of aggression requiring U.S. intervention (1823)
  • US President Polk declared Manifest Destiny which stated the US had a destiny to colonize and expand the West (1845)
  • US Civil War: John Brown hanged for raid on Harper’s Ferry (1859)
  • Crowds attack US embassy in Tripoli, Libya (1979)
  • Fidel Castro declares he’s a Marxist & will lead Cuba to Communism (1961)
  • Fidel Castro becomes President of Cuba replacing Osvaldo Dorticós Torrado (1976)
  • World Missions Fellowship was founded as European Christian Orphanage and Mission Society in Canada (1946)
  • Napoleon Bonaparte is crowned emperor of France in Paris (1804)
  • Fred Astaire’s first film, Dancing Lady, was released (1933)
  • Child Emperor Pu Yi ascends the Chinese throne at the age of two (1908)

December 3:

  • George Smith announced the discovery of a flood story similar to Noah’s flood story from another historical source, Gilgamesh Epic (1872)
  • WW2: Birth of Mitsuo Fuchida, the pilot who flew the lead plane in Japan’s air attack on Pearl Harbor (1902)
  • US Revolutionary War: First official US flag raised aboard naval vessel USS Alfred (1775)
  • Oberlin College in Ohio, the first truly coeducational and biracial college, opens (1833)
  • Frederick Douglass publishes first issue of his newspaper North Star (1847)
  • Cassian and Marcellus Beheaded for Their Bold Stand for Christ (298 AD)
  • Paul White, missionary doctor known as “The Jungle Doctor” gave his life to Christ (1926)
  • Astronomer Anders Celsius takes measurements that confirm Newton’s theory that the earth was an ellipsoid rather than the previously accepted sphere (1736)
  • First human heart transplant performed by Dr Christian Barnard, South Africa (1967)
  • Civil War: First blacks on US trial jury appointed for Jefferson Davis trial (1868)
  • Illinois becomes 21st state (1818)
  • Police arrests 800 sit-in students at University of California at Berkeley (1964)

December 4:

  • 38 colonists from Berkeley Parish in England disembark in Virginia and give thanks to God, considered by many as the first Thanksgiving in the Americas (1619)
  • WW1: President Woodrow Wilson sails for Versailles Peace Conference in France, 1st President to travel outside US while in office (1918)
  • International Bible Society was founded in New York City (1809)
  • Birth of Mary Reed, American Methodist missionary who spent 52 years of her life ministering to the lepers of India (1854)
  • American Anti-Slavery Society formed by Arthur Tappan in Philadelphia (1833)
  • The ship the Mary Celeste discovered mysteriously abandoned by her crew in the Atlantic Ocean (1872)
  • Britain outlaws “suttee” in India – widow burning herself to death on her husband’s funeral pyre (1829)
  • Killer fogs begin in London, England; “Smog” becomes a word (1952)
  • The first edition of the Los Angeles Times is published (1881)

This Week in History 11/21 – 11/27

HistoryThis Week in History

November 21:

  • Judas Maccabaeus, son of Mattathias of the Hasmonean family, restores the Temple in Jerusalem, celebrated every year during Hanukkah (164 BC)
  • Mayflower Compact signed by Pilgrims at Cape Cod (1620)
  • US President John F. Kennedy flies to Texas, assassinated the next day (1963)
  • Thomas Edison announces his first great invention, the phonograph (1877)
  • North Carolina ratifies constitution, becomes 12th US state (1789)
  • Duke University was founded as Union Institute by Methodists (1852)
  • Richard Johnson, a free black, granted 550 acres in Virginia (1654)
  • US President Richard Nixon’s attorney, J Fred Buzhardt, reveals presence of 18½ minute gap in a White House tape recording related to Watergate (1973)
  • Freedom of Information Act passed by Congress over President Ford’s veto (1974)
  • North Carolina ratifies constitution and becomes 12th US state (1789)
  • French Revolution: Colonel Napoléon Bonaparte is promoted to full general and appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of the French Republic (1791)
  • Russia’s Tsar Alexander I petitions for a Jewish state in Palestine (1918)
  • Jack Benny, violin, & Richard Nixon, piano, play their famed duet (1959)
  • Honolulu Harbor discovered (1794)
  • Authorities at the British Natural History Museum announce the “Piltdown Man” skull, one of the most famous fossil skulls in the world, is a hoax (1953)

November 22:

  • US President John F. Kennedy assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas. Lyndon B. Johnson sworn in as 36th president. (1963)
  • Isolation of single gene announced by scientists at Harvard University (1969)
  • International Radio Telecommunications Com adopts “SOS” as new call for help (1906)
  • Fred Rogers of PBS Mr Rogers Neighborhood presents a sweater to Smithsonian Institution (1984)
  • In Nigeria, more than 100 people are killed at an attack aimed at the contestants of the Miss World contest (2002)
  • American lawyer Horatio G. Spafford’s four daughters drowned when their passenger ship collided with another and sank leading him to write the hymn, It is Well With My Soul (1873)
  • RCA Records make its best investment paying $35,000 to Sun Records for Elvis Presley’s contract (1955)
  • Author and theologian CS Lewis died (1963)
  • Isolation of single gene announced by scientists at Harvard University (1969)
  • WW1: Calvin Coolidge pardons WW I German spy Lothar Witzke who was sentenced to death (1923)
  • Spain delegates “New Laws” against slavery in America (1542)

November 23:

  • Doctor Who, the long-running British sci-fi series, debuts (1963)
  • Clement, fourth bishop of Rome, martyred (101 AD)
  • First issue of Life Magazine published (1936)
  • Patent granted for a process of making color photographs (1863)
  • Wright Brothers form corporation to manufacture airplanes (1909)
  • World’s first jukebox opens in San Francisco (1889)
  • US Civil War: Battle of Chattanooga & Orchard Knob, Tennessee begins (1863)
  • 60 Ethiopia government officials executed (1974)
  • US President Harding signs Willis Campell Act forbidding doctors prescribing beer or liquor for medicinal purposes (1921)
  • Charlemagne arrives at Rome to investigate the alleged crimes of Pope Leo III (800 AD)
  • Areopagitica, a pamphlet by John Milton, decrying censorship, is published (1644)
  • French mathematician, scientist, and philosopher Blaise Pascal experiences an intense vision that converts him to Christianity and convinces him to become a preacher (1654)
  • Female Medical Educational Society forms in Boston (1848)

November 24:

  • US Civil War: Battle of Chattanooga, Columbia, & Lookout Mountain begins in Tennessee (1863)
  • Nine police officers and one civilian are killed when a bomb explodes at the Milwaukee, Wisconsin police headquarters building (1917)
  • Canadian missionary Franois Blanchet, known as the Apostle of Oregon, first arrived in the Oregon Territory (1838)
  • Jack Ruby kills Lee Harvey Oswald, assassin of JFK (1963)
  • First observation of transit of Venus by Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree – helped establish size of the Solar System (1639)
  • Vietnam War: US admits troops in Vietnam were exposed to the toxic Agent Orange (1979)
  • The US House of Representatives Committee on Un-American Activities finds “Hollywood 10” in contempt because of their refusal to reveal whether they were communists (1947)
  • Joseph F Glidden patents barbed wire (1874)
  • National Rifle Association organized (1871)
  • FBI Crime Lab opens in Washington DC (1932)
  • First observation of transit of Venus by Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree that helped establish size of the Solar System (1639)
  • Air Force One christened (1954)
  • 400 die of respiratory failure & heart attack in killer NYC smog (1966)
  • Korean War: UN troops begin an assault intending to end Korean War by Christmas (1950)
  • WW2: American Woman’s Suffrage Association forms (1869)
  • Pacifist/anti fascist writer Carl Von Ossietzky sent to concentration camp, awarded Nobel Peace Prize (1936)
  • River Thames in London freezes over (1434) (1715)
  • Baptist Foreign Missions Convention of the United States was founded (1880)

November 25:

  • According to Archbishop James Ussher’s Old Testament Chronology, The Great Deluge, the flood from the Bible, happened on this date (2348 BC)
  • Thousands of Christians massacred in present day Ethiopia (523 AD)
  • FDR establishes modern celebration of Thanksgiving Day (1941)
  • Alfred Nobel patents dynamite (1867)
  • 35 survivors of the mutiny on the slave ship Amistad return to Africa (1831)
  • WW2: Germany & Japan sign anti-Komintern pact (1936)
  • US Civil War: Battle of Missionary Ridge, Tennessee (1863)
  • US Revolutionary War: Britain evacuates New York City, its last military position in United States (1783)
  • Indian Wars: In retaliation for the American defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, United States Army troops sack Chief Dull Knife’s sleeping Cheyenne village at the headwaters of the Powder River (1876)
  • US Congress commission looks into “impeachment” of President Andrew Johnson (1867)
  • JFK laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery (1963)
  • Woody Woodpecker debuts with release of Walter Lantz’s Knock Knock (1940)
  • Spain grants Puerto Rico autonomy (1897)
  • Farmer’s Almanac first published (1792)
  • David Brainerd was approved as a missionary to the New England Indians by the Scottish Society for the Propagating of Christian Knowledge (1742)
  • WW2: German Jews in Netherlands declared stateless after losing their nationality (1941)
  • US Civil War: Confederate plot to burn New York city fails (1864)
  • French and Indian War: Britain captures Fort Duquesne later Fort Pitt/Pittsburgh from French (1758)
  • First English patent granted to an American for processing corn (1715)
  • John B Meyenberg of St Louis patents evaporated milk (1884)
  • American College of Surgeons incorporates in Springield, Illinois (1912)
  • US Greenback Party established as a political party consisting primarily of farmers affected by the Panic of 1873 (1874)
  • First sword swallower in US performs (1817)
  • A deadly earthquake rocks Shemakha, in the Caucasus, killing 80,000 people (1667)
  • Delmonico’s, one of New York’s finest restaurants, provides a meal of soup, steak, coffee & half a pie for 12 cents (1834)
  • First Thanksgiving Parade in Philadelphia (1920)

November 26:

  • President George Washington proclaimed this date, a Thursday, to be the first national Thanksgiving Day holiday (1789)
  • The US Navy began using chaplains within its regular service (1775)
  • WW2: German theologian Karl Barth who declared German Christians first allegiance to Christ gives them the duty to resist Nazis, a declaration that founded the Confessing Church, surrendered to the Nazis (1934)
  • US Civil War: West Virginia is created out of Virginia (1861)
  • Captain Cook discovers Maui in the Sandwich Islands now known as Hawaii (1778)
  • Casablanca starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman is released (1942)
  • Vietnam War: Lottery for selective service draft signed by President Nixon (1969)
  • Rose Mary Woods, Nixon’s secretary, testifies she accidentally erased 18 1/2 minutes of White House recordings (1973)
  • WW1: Greece declares war on Germany (1916)
  • 455 die in snow/ice storm (1898)
  • WW2: Nazis started to wall off Jewish Ghetto in Warsaw (1940)
  • Last weekly installment of Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities published in magazine (1859)
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carrol published in US (1865)
  • University of Notre Dame founded (1842)
  • First refrigerated car patented (1867)
  • First streetcar railway in America starts operating in New York City (1832)
  • Hawaii Sugar Planters Association formed (1895)
  • Archaeologist Howard Carter opens King Tut’s tomb in Egypt (1922)
  • Mongolian’s People’s Republic declared (1924)
  • Fab Four make first recording under new name – The Beatles (1962)

November 27:

  • First Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is held in New York City (1924)
  • John Walker invents friction match in England (1826)
  • Jedidiah Strong Smith entered California’s San Bernardino Valley becoming the first American to cross over the southwestern part of North America (1826)
  • Alfred Nobels establishes Nobel Prizes (1895)
  • Korean War: Cease-fire & demarcation zone accord signed in Panmunjon, Korea (1951)
  • Pope Urban II solemnly proclaimed the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont (1095)
  • Land for the first Jewish settlement in America was purchased by Joseph Salvador (1755)
  • A hydrogen atmosphere is discovered on the extrasolar planet Osiris by the Hubble Space Telescope, the first atmosphere detected on an extrasolar planet (2001)
  • Dutch county of Groningen flooded by failure of dyke (1587)
  • US soldiers attack Florida Indian village beginning Seminole War (1817)
  • New York Times dubs baseball “The National Game” (1870)
  • Audience throws vegetables at actors for 1st recorded time in US (1911)